tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-57830920380386536932013-05-14T16:00:10.108-07:00Gary Robbins, Endurance Athlete Live With Passion, Pursue Your Dreams Gary Robbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/05822369954547608581noreply@blogger.comBlogger503125tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-32995327953104036472013-05-14T12:54:00.000-07:002013-05-14T14:28:01.852-07:00A 100 Mile Journey Around Mt. Fuji <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VH-Ahf_o-bA/UZHqZqpvsNI/AAAAAAAALOs/RgQwoIe2RuI/s1600/920848_10151479504803124_1291999992_o.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="266" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VH-Ahf_o-bA/UZHqZqpvsNI/AAAAAAAALOs/RgQwoIe2RuI/s400/920848_10151479504803124_1291999992_o.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">I do not have a record of who took this picture and shared it with me.<br />If you recognize the image please notify me so I can give proper photo credits</td></tr></tbody></table>The first climb of the race held approximately 1600 feet / 500 meters of elevation gain and it began just two miles in. After nearly decapitating a few teammates due to some non-breakaway tape on the starting line, I narrowly avoided being stampeded by the nearly 1000 runners behind me who were also tackling the 100 miles around Mt. Fuji. Staying controlled over the first few miles was no easy task and even while hanging back around 12th place overall I still managed a few back to back 6m30s miles to open my 100 mile journey. (If you want a good laugh <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xcXh3H2fUM">FFWD this video to 1m47s</a> and then freeze frame it through the start)<br /><br />The fact that my calves were already feeling lactic while climbing unusually large and seemingly endless dirt stairs by mile four just reinforced the fact that UTMF was a bit of a different beast. A 100 mile run in which approximately 30% of the terrain was paved and fully runnable, yet the remaining 70% would somehow contain nearly 30,000ft / 9,000m of climbing and descent. It just didn't make any sense to me. The math seemed to be missing a variable. How steep could the terrain really be? Oh hardy har har har. The joke was in fact on us and the equation was about to be balanced, one painful mile at a time.<br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xpcdHx8YLN4/UZHlSK2XpFI/AAAAAAAALNk/IFeqhIZVhFk/s1600/D4C_2673_1.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="200" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xpcdHx8YLN4/UZHlSK2XpFI/AAAAAAAALNk/IFeqhIZVhFk/s200/D4C_2673_1.JPG" width="133" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Shinpei Koseki</td></tr></tbody></table>After twelve miles of racing and the aforementioned 1600 foot hump I'd had nine miles of running at seven minute mile pace or better under my belt. That's not the kind of running you'd expect to do in a mountainous 100 miler. The next four miles, which took us to the sixteen mile aid station, were covered at an approximate 7m30s pace over undulating terrain. Immediately following the aid station we were finally into the steepness I'd prepared for. The trail underfoot on was an approximate 30% grade which is very&nbsp;comparable&nbsp;to the grade I did the bulk of my training over. The first 16m/26km of the race, had been covered in just over two hours.<br /><br />With a 3pm start time and a 5:30pm sunset my <a href="http://princetontec.com/apex-pro">Princeton Tec headlamp</a> was now shining bright. I had held my own over the opening miles and slowly moved my way up into the top ten, and then the top five. Within the first mile of this climb I now found myself up in fourth. Just two miles later and the course topped out at close to 5,000 feet, in which I was anticipating a super enjoyable descent. Though the terrain disappeared nicely at a near 35% grade in the upper portions I picked my way though it before I started to experience acute and intense foot pain. Foot pain directly where I had broken my foot twice before. Foot pain that I had not felt since getting back off of crutches over a year and a half prior. The pain would be brief but super intense and left no doubt as to its whereabouts, and it was freaking me the f#@k out. The sensation never lasted for more than the individual foot strike and was acute enough to balance perfectly with allowing me to continue racing while never allowing me to stop worrying about when it might flare again. A nice little internal dialogue&nbsp;ensued&nbsp;in which I basically told myself that I'd have to pull out of the race if it didn't somehow rectify itself. I've been in hospitals in New Zealand, Australia, El Salvador, Honduras, Oregon and Hawaii. I've filed over $20,000 in out of country medical claims (that have all thankfully been fully covered by my $75 annual policy) and I simply had absolutely ZERO intentions of adding Japan to my international hospitals list. At 36 years of age I'd really prefer if the next time I end up in a hospital is when Linda and I start a family in a few years time.<br /><br />One, two, three, four, five. Five "f#@k me" moments in about an hour of running. As the terrain eased underfoot the pain within the foot disappeared altogether so I just decided to roll with it. In a funny conversation with friends after the race.<br /><br />"It was an intense localized pain from about hour three till four, but then it subsided and I never felt it even one more time over the next sixteen hours of running"<br /><br />By the time I'd reached the water station at about mile twenty three the foot pain seemed a distant memory, though I was then hoping that it was not going to be terrain specific and simply spike in pain again on the impending descents. As mentioned though it subsided and never flared again. As a preventative measure I actually had an x-ray on it today and even my Doctor could not believe how great the images looked. All is good and it just seems to be 'one of those things' that can happen when you go and run for a full day in the mountains.<br /><br />I spotted Australian runner Brendan Davies hitting the water station ahead of me but failed to notice that I'd passed him in transition. About a half a mile after the water station there was a volunteer on the gravel road who was directing me to my left and onto a singletrack climb. The course flagging, which included reflective lights, pylons, volunteers, volunteers with mini light sabers and just generally anything and anyone in place to ensure you did not take a wrong turn was truly beyond anything I'd ever seen in a 100 mile race. It's a testament to Tsuyoshi Kaburaki, his team and the entire Japanese running community, and quite the site to behold. This volunteer directed me to my left. There were little blinky lights on the flagging tape up the climb. I looked left, then up, then up further, then straight up. I tried to make a joke in English to the volunteer which involved me using my arm like an airplane taking off. We were about to go vertical.<br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-JANEEIjP1-M/UZHlmoxL_YI/AAAAAAAALNs/I0Tqrl4FO8s/s1600/D4C_1877.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="200" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-JANEEIjP1-M/UZHlmoxL_YI/AAAAAAAALNs/I0Tqrl4FO8s/s200/D4C_1877.JPG" width="133" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Shinpei Koseki</td></tr></tbody></table>I train on steep-ass terrain. I LOVE super steep unrunnable terrain that forces you into a power hike, bent at the waist, hands on knees, straining to breath just to sustain twenty minute mile pace. I excel at this discipline though I'd never seen anything quite like what I was staring at before. It was the lack of noticeable switchbacks that really accentuated what I was confronted with, but the next single mile was going to climb 2600ft / 800m at a maximum grade of up to, including, and slightly over 50%. For reference a double black diamond ski run will often be in the 30-40% range. Because there were blinking lights on the flagging tape going up the trail it felt as though you could look straight up, like you should be able to see stars but instead they were flashing and you knew you had to pull those stars out of the sky under your own power. I reached forward in the dark to grab any solid object I could find to help pull me up the trail. A friend described it best when he said, "and then the trail was right in front of your face"<br /><br />You never really feel like you're racing up this terrain as your cadence is so low, though the lack of oxygen reaching your brain leaves no doubt that you are indeed pushing to you maximum pace just to continue forward momentum. Before I realized it I was closing in on the headlamp of then second place French runner Cyril Cointre. I pulled ahead of Cyril just before our 50% grade climb gave way into a 53% grade descent. Cyril pulled right up to me and all of a sudden we were kind of caught up in a 'who's the better downhill runner' game among two guys who obviously prided themselves on how they could cover downhill terrain. Nothing about what we were doing felt overly intelligent but it was fun to have another runner to push the pace with.<br /><br />After a slight uphill grind in the landscape I promptly took my head out of my ass and pulled aside, waving Cyril past and simply saying "you lead" to which I immediately let him go. We were less than thirty miles in and on the first of what was promising to be many sizable descents. It was far too early to be revving the pistons up. Not ten minutes later did my quads reiterate my decision by starting to cramp.<br /><br />'You've gotta be kidding me' I thought. I glanced at my watch to see I'd been racing for approximately 4h30mins. 'This is bad. This is really bad. I don't know if you can recover from this Gary? I think you've potentially already made mistakes that are going to haunt you for the rest of the race.'<br /><br />The Greatest Magic Trick I've Ever Performed. Disappearing, Reappearing, Disappearing Quads.<br /><br />I huge component of ultra running and more specifically 100 mile running is the ability to constantly and honestly assess your physical situation so that you can make appropriate decisions that ensure you are able to perform at your optimal level. I was struggling through some tough decisions and realizations that also forced me to question the first 4+ hours of my day. Had I gone out too hard? Was I running someone else's race without noticing it? Could I maintain my current slightly slower pace without cramping or would I have to slow further? Was my race effectively done? Would I be forced to drop out? Would I even finish this race today? How could this be happening to me? Quad strength and resilience was one thing I worked hard at and prided myself on, how in the world could that be my weak link on this day? Were my quads getting better or worse? How was my nutrition? How was my nutrition? How was my nutrition? How was my...<br /><br />I'd been doing a decent job at staying in the optimal range of 200-300 calories an hour since the race had begun but I had been ignoring the overwhelming sense of hunger that would not subside no matter how many race food calories I injected. Looking back over my day in that moment I realized that I'd in fact eaten very little in advance of the 3pm start. It was now 7:30pm and I hadn't had much of a meal in nearly twelve hours. The mere recognition of this seemed to prompt an unsettled grumble in my belly as if it were calling for help. I had a <a href="http://www.hammernutrition.ca/fuels/hammer-bars/">Hammer bar</a> in my pack so I reached back and promptly devoured it. Sure enough, some solid calories combined with the slightly slower pace and my quad cramping subsided. This small victory felt pretty huge in that moment and I high five'd myself in my mind for working my way through it.<br /><br />What goes up must go down and on this ridge that meant going up again, and then down again, and then up, and down and up and down and up and down again, and then for good measure you went up a sixth distinct spine before finally dropping some 2700 feet in just over a mile with a maximum grade somewhere in the 57% range. From start to finish this approximate 12m / 19k section took three full hours. An hour after the first quad issues my quads started to speak to me again. Once more I managed to eat them back into submission.<br /><br />When we finally dropped down off this ridge we hit pavement and flat runnable terrain again. Time to wake up the legs!<br /><br />As I was approaching the mile thirty-three aid station in third place, while running paved roads through a small town, a Japanese runner wearing #113 came screaming past me like he was in a 10k road race. The only thing I could figure was that he was looking for the accolades that would come with arriving at the aid station in third place while also being the first Japanese runner. There was simply no way that he was running a smart race and his pace certainly wasn't sustainable so I wrote him off without a second thought. Turns out most of us did. Hara Yoshikazu wasn't one of the pre-race favorites and I knew this when he passed me. I'd paid attention to who my competition was and who I needed to be aware of. Hara was in fact running his very first 100 miler, though he had won a 100km trail race in a time of 6h33m, which is pretty nuts. This of course was all information that I would not be able to source until after the race. In that moment Hara was just a runner that I was certain would either DNF or slow considerably and struggle to finish at all.<br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Q7iAO4lm1EQ/UZHo_MaUpyI/AAAAAAAALOg/qYJO40lYNRY/s1600/D8C_4556.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Q7iAO4lm1EQ/UZHo_MaUpyI/AAAAAAAALOg/qYJO40lYNRY/s320/D8C_4556.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Shinpei Koseki</td></tr></tbody></table>I hit the aid station in fourth, thirteen minutes behind defending champion and pre-race favorite Julien Chorier, 4m30s behind Cyril, and now one minute behind Hara. The race was six and a half hours old and I was exactly where I was hoping to be. Heading to Japan I had every faith in my abilities as a 100 mile runner over mountainous terrain, and after training with last year's second place finisher Adam Campbell I had every confidence that I was strong enough and healthy enough to challenge for the lead and a hopeful podium finish. The race was still in its infancy but I felt like I'd dodged a bullet with my quad issues, and once I saw my amazing <a href="http://www.salomon.com/us/">Salomon</a> support crew and they provided me with a triangle of rice wrapped in seaweed it only served to confirm my earlier findings. My quads had started to seize from a lack of overall calories on the day, not a lack of per hour racing calories, and getting solid food into my stomach was like riding on the wings of a unicorn...or at least how I'd envision that to feel. My spirits were buoyed by a simple 300 calorie reward and my legs seemed to forget that they'd threatened to leave me for dead just an hour earlier. (I've been told that if I don't correct Unicorn to Pegasus that I won't be getting married in Sept...OR Unipeg, greatest creature ever not created)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_y7-fE87mQE/UZHjyek2HpI/AAAAAAAALM8/io3zT_poeDY/s1600/D4C_3016.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_y7-fE87mQE/UZHjyek2HpI/AAAAAAAALM8/io3zT_poeDY/s320/D4C_3016.JPG" width="213" /></a></div>The next twenty-two miles of the course, bringing us up to the midway point, were predominantly paved and with a continual slightly uphill grade. This was the longest sustained runnable section of the entire race. Adam had told me about the UTMF course and how sections of flat'ish pavement were&nbsp;interspersed relentlessly with super steep mountain terrain. In training I'd run a 50km road run on a near weekly basis for the last few months. This wasn't as much about developing any additional foot speed as it was about training my mind to handle the&nbsp;monotony&nbsp;of this task at hand. I needed to learn how to zone out and click off kilometers for hours on end without a single excuse to walk, hike, or stop for any reason. This training was now paying dividends for as much as I continually wanted to stop and walk this section of the course there was simply no physical reason to do so.<br /><br />We could not have gotten any luckier with the weather for the race as just hours before the race started a few rain clouds passed over the starting line and we were concerned for what might lay ahead. In the end we ran under a cloudless sky AND a full moon! So bright was the night sky through this exposed section of the course that I managed to shut my headlamp off and simply run by the light of the night orb over my shoulder. Though we were covering a mix of paved and then gravel surface road it was at least an isolated backroad in the forest with absolutely no car traffic or outside distractions. It felt as though we were running through a park and with my headlamp off, lit from above, clicking off mindless miles of the race I found one of those rare and special moments of peace. This is why I do this I thought. This is special. This journey and sense of adventure is what I crave from life.<br /><br />I have a storied history of getting lost in races. It was this and this alone that forced me to once again turn my headlamp back on as I knew I'd never live down missing a turn in the night because I was running with my headlamp off. Not two minutes after I switched my lamp back on though did I end up jumping over a dormant snake on the side of the road. Just an over sized grass/garter snake was my best guess but having been confronted by a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_brown_snake">brown snake</a> in an Australian expedition adventure race once I at least decided to pay greater attention to where my feet were landing.<br /><br />As the road angled upwards the motivation to continue running waned, but again there was no reason other than mental fatigue to break stride. At about this time I spotted Cyril up ahead and walking. As I caught him all he said was "how far?"<br />To which I responded "About 3km"<br />"Okay thanks"<br /><br />Taking it down a notch three hours earlier had saved my race.<br /><br />There was a slight and slightly unexpected out and back as we approached the next aid station. Hara came running towards me, to which I spat out, "Wha!? Am I going the right way!?"<br /><br />His general lack of response told me that his English probably rivaled my Japanese, and that this was likely an out and back.<br /><br />Next up was Julien, now less than five minutes ahead of me. I was in third AND I'd managed to make up eight full minutes on him in that section, but Hara was now eleven minutes clear of me and showing no signs of weakness. It was clear now that Hara was indeed a threat on the day, a completely unexpected runner was not only in the lead but he'd been making significant gains over all of us on the faster sections of the race.<br /><br />Out and back sections can be pretty tough in trail races. The forest and mountains can hide so much, with runners merely minutes apart never once catching a glimpse of each other. In referencing post race splits it's evident that nothing really changed through this section in terms of competitors behind me catching up, however they were now thrown in front of you like they'd appeared out of nowhere and were somehow running twice as fast as you. The out and back was only a few miles long and I said hi to nearly half a dozen people behind me. This had the effect of getting kicked in the nads repeatedly. Again like unicorn wings, not something I've yet experienced in my life, but basically how I'd expect it to feel.<br /><br />I had JUST made up nearly ten minutes on one Julien Chorier yet somehow because there were half a dozen runners within thirteen minutes of me I became convinced that the wheels were coming off. So convinced of this was I that I started coaching myself for how to react WHEN those runners behind me caught me. In essence I was prepping myself for the inevitable letdown that would occur and attempting to rally in advance of this letdown to ensure that I didn't temporarily give up on myself WHEN those runners caught me. This is a common reaction when things like this happen in racing and basically I was recreating it in my head to attempt to limit my loses once it actually unfolded. I promised myself that I would make every additional effort necessary to latch onto those beasts behind me once they tracked me down and I'd fight like hell to keep from getting spit out behind them. All the while being 100% certain it was an inevitability.<br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-YEbjdl0LHgI/UZHnODoJEoI/AAAAAAAALOA/pIv3zFvFiI8/s1600/D8C_4635.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-YEbjdl0LHgI/UZHnODoJEoI/AAAAAAAALOA/pIv3zFvFiI8/s320/D8C_4635.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Shinpei Koseki</td></tr></tbody></table>I just kept trucking along as the terrain grew in steepness and technicality. I kept my head down and went to work and a funny thing happened. No one caught me. I shoulder checked repeatedly and it wasn't until I arrived at the next aid station unscathed that I had managed to regain some of my confidence in how well I was moving. I just never ceases to amaze. You are moving at a set pace of 10km/hr for arguments sake. You catch the runner in front of you and you naturally speed up and feel amazing. The adrenaline catches a hold of you and you can't believe how FAST you're running. Reverse the scenario, going the exact same speed, in the exact same initial head space, yet getting caught yourself you somehow suffer a massive letdown and your mind gets the better of you. I was thankful that I had yet to deal with the latter and was hopeful that I'd soon be dealing with the former.<br /><br />Clearing another aid station without seeing a runner from behind and learning that I was holding my own against the two in front of me was reassuring. The next section of the race contained the literal and figurative high point along with one of the weirdest things I've ever heard of in a trail race, a mandatory walking section.<br /><br />Immediately after departing I was instructed "no running in this section." This had of course been covered in advance of the race but now that I was confronted with its reality I was disappointed that the terrain was in fact so damn flat and easy. To be all alone in third in a highly competitive 100 mile race and then to self govern walking over terrain that you would be forced to run if you sneezed or caught your toe on a rock was a bit torturous. It demanded trusting that your opponents were in fact honouring the same rules as you. Given that Japanese culture is probably the most honour based society on the planet I convinced myself that should I chose to run I'd surely be struck down by some god of the trails and have my foot clear severed in half should I break their code of conduct. Not a minute later I came across two volunteers almost hiding in the woods and holding up a sign in English,<br /><br />"Walk Only"<br /><br />I was congratulated with a ceremonial golf clap for adhering to the rules. Truth be told though I was shoulder checking the entire time while attempting to channel my inner Olympic speed walker, swaying my hips hither and tither and had I spotted a headlamp closing in on me I was prepared to erupt into a sprint as there was no way a gap of the minutes I possessed could be honestly closed if everyone were walking, speed walking or not. I saw no lights and was thankful for it. The flat slowly steered itself upwards and before long a hike was all anyone would be able to sustain anyways<br /><br />As we topped out at the highest point on the course at just under 6,000 feet the full moon illuminating Fuji immediately to our left, as we were now on her flanks, the landscape transformed itself into a lunar style volcanic rock. Volunteers manned the high point and said in broken English,<br /><br />"Okay to run"<br /><br />I basically asked them to repeat those words three times before I exploded into a scree field of volcanic rock, taking a few kilos of it with me in my shoes to deposit at the next aid station.<br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-IfcUs9r9u4A/UZHgaJlPLkI/AAAAAAAALMM/lldKqX3GYdo/s1600/D8C_4627.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="266" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-IfcUs9r9u4A/UZHgaJlPLkI/AAAAAAAALMM/lldKqX3GYdo/s400/D8C_4627.JPG" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Photo Credit Shinpei Kosecki</td></tr></tbody></table>The next 6m/10k was almost all downhill while losing about 2,000ft of elevation. I departed ten minutes behind Julien for 2nd and arrived at A7 - 105.3km just eight minutes in arrears. The volunteers at A7 actually told me that I was eight minutes behind BOTH runners. BOTH runners! I thought, that's it Hara has cracked and Julien hasn't been making any ground on me. Looking at the somewhat inaccurate course profile I figured this was my best chance to put in a bit of a push and to get myself within striking distance of the lead.<br /><br />Hearing that I was eight minutes back I was hoping to make up five minutes over the next ten miles of the course. I wanted to arrive at A8 - 121.7km and hear the words,<br />"You are just three minutes behind the leaders!"<br /><br />If I remember correctly it was 3:30am what I started into the climb and felt just slightly better than Death on a Monday after a long weekend. It was finally time to use my greatest weapon, my music. I pulled out my MP3 and bluetooth earbuds and fired it up. Within minutes I was wide awake and moving faster over the mountains than even I would have guessed possible. Singing out loud, pumping my fists to the beats, anticipating and embracing the terrain ahead rather than fearing it. The music in my ears quickly made me feel at one with the earth under my feet and though I'd hesitate to say I felt like I was floating over the terrain I became confident and almost hyper aware of my every stride. This confidence lead to more unencumbered running than a body wearing nearly 13 hours of constant movement would normally possess. My questions about IF I was making time on Hara and Julien were replaced by questions about HOW MUCH time I was making. I simply knew that with relatively consistent splits between all of us over the last forty miles that I was now outpacing my nearest competitors.<br /><br />The sun started to rise and presented a scene of beauty that left me nearly pinching myself. Fuji in all her glory, a full moon lingering off her shoulder, a red blanket colouring the horizon, and a Lake Yamanakako appearing from within the shadows down below as though a curtain had been drawn back on its slumber. A brief moment after digesting all of this and there were photographers and videographers dotting the landscape in front of me. They'd positioned themselves for just this moment in the race and I threw my arms in the arm and screamed,<br />"Can you believe this! This is AMAZING!!"<br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-bNHbDjrnpI0/UZHolQukB5I/AAAAAAAALOY/C7qQgd3IK-M/s1600/D8C_4438_1.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-bNHbDjrnpI0/UZHolQukB5I/AAAAAAAALOY/C7qQgd3IK-M/s320/D8C_4438_1.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Shinpei Koseki</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RkWcrXf_0G0/UZHnfkvRosI/AAAAAAAALOI/Ht_eCnuCqmY/s1600/D8C_4698.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RkWcrXf_0G0/UZHnfkvRosI/AAAAAAAALOI/Ht_eCnuCqmY/s320/D8C_4698.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Shinpei Koseki</td></tr></tbody></table>Feeling the sun rise over you in a race that takes you non stop through the darkness of the night all by yourself is a bit like the warm embrace of a loved one that you've gone far too long without seeing. It's all at once foreign and familiar and comforting beyond reason. I was now wide awake and alive by every possible definition of those words, and not five minutes later <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BufTp1DAdiE">this happened</a> (fast forward to 1m45s for the sunrise shot and what follows)<br /><br />I came around the corner and he was right in front of me. I had no inkling that I was so close to Julien <br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Cjn9XWWWRCM/UZHn49q5oWI/AAAAAAAALOQ/CXrlvwyzhfY/s1600/D4C_3252_1.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Cjn9XWWWRCM/UZHn49q5oWI/AAAAAAAALOQ/CXrlvwyzhfY/s320/D4C_3252_1.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Shinpei Koseki</td></tr></tbody></table>and that I'd taken back the eight minutes he had over me in half the distance that I though it would take to gain just five of those minutes.<br /><div style="text-align: left;"></div><br />As I pulled up alongside him he asked, "Who's that?"<br />I responded "It's Gary"<br /><br />Even though we'd met a few days earlier and spent enough time together via the team to become&nbsp;acquaintances&nbsp;he just was not expecting to see ME and hence did not process who Gary was. I pulled alongside of him and as he looked over to see just who was there he inadvertently uttered "Oh no no no"<br /><br />This was comical for numerous reasons, not the least of which was that he just seemed to have blurted out his thoughts more than anything else in particular. I managed to translate what that meant into English though.<br /><br />"Umm, excuse me! No, no, no. There's a clause somewhere in your Salomon contract that states that you can not pass Julien Chorier. I think you need to step aside and revisit what you signed IMMEDIATELY you smelly Canadian bastard."<br /><br />(Julien could not be a nicer person. None of what I said above was actually thought by Julien, at least not that I know of. He in fact came up to me post race and specifically commented on how impressed he was by how I was moving at that point in the race...before he laughed at me for beating me and jabbed me in the eye with a French flag...and he even apologized for not realizing who 'Gary' was in the moment. Class act all the way with a great sense of humor as well)<br /><br />I had just passed Julien Chorier. If I'm not mistaken Julien had yet to be been beaten in a 100 mile race and his resume is stoopid stacked with amazing results. It was mile 75'ish and in that exact moment in time it was the best I'd felt compared to where we were in the race all race long. My Imagine Dragons song I referenced in my <a href="http://www.irunfar.com/2013/01/gary-robbins-hurt-100-race-report.html">HURT race report</a> was next up on my playlist and the trail cut left and proceeded straight down. My adrenaline was pumping and within two minutes of passing Julien I could no longer see him behind me on an open section of trail.<br /><br />I'D WON THE RACE! It was mile 75 and I was in second, but with all the positive emotions that had collided inside of me it was like a cheetah had mated with flying squirrel that'd co-evolved with a flying fish...that'd be one badass creature with wings mind you, I was dropping miles like I was counting in the 90's for distance and not the 70's.<br /><br />Mile 75...76...77...78...79 into the aid station with cameras and live feeds and the unexpected 2nd place runner getting his fair share of early accolades.<br /><br />"How do you feel?"<br /><br />"Like this race is about 21 miles longer than I'd realized"<br /><br />I was in and out without seeing that not only was Julien just over five minutes behind me, but he had now teamed up with fellow French legend and co-pre-race favorite North Face runner Sebastien Chaigneau.<br /><br />I knew within a mile of departing the aid station that I'd given too much too early. I'd made a mistake and now I had to pay for it. This was my sixth hundred miler yet I should have and do know better than this. I was internally scolding myself as I processed just how bad the damage was.<br /><br />Could I finish? Definitely, eventually, with a 48 hour cutoff at least I would hope so.<br />Could I catch the lead runner? Absolutely not.<br />Could I hang onto second place? Doubtful. It's not like Julien Chorier goes 'oh I was passed by a runner. On no no no, I guess that is that and this race is over for me, it was nice while it lasted'<br />Could I hang on to top ten? I certainly hoped so but honestly I was in a bad spot and I knew it.<br /><br />Head down, go to work. Don't think, just do. One foot in front of the other. Eat, drink, repeat. Distract the mind as much as possible. Try not to look at the mileage on the <a href="http://www.suunto.com/Products/sports-watches/Suunto-Ambit/Suunto-Ambit-Black-HR/">Ambit</a> as it's clicking off slower than paint drying. Try to stay positive. Try not to freak out at the fact that Julien has just passed me while I was filling my water bottle at the next water station. I swear he shot laser beams through me with his eyes as if to say don't even f#@king think about trying that shit again!<br /><br />Try not to look straight up at the fact that this climb appears to go on forever. Try not to freak out over the fact that Sebastien, who I haven't seen since mile five, has just appeared out of thin air and is passing me like I'm moving backwards. Am I moving backwards? Hard to tell but either way I'm giving it all I've got.<br /><br />Seb tells me the worst is yet to come.<br />"REALLY!?"<br />"Yup, steepest section of the race is yet to come."<br /><br />Nothing, and I mean nothing on my course profile eludes to or prepares me for what's to come. I honestly thought I was about to the top of this section, the apparent last significant climb of the race, but in fact I was on false summit one of three and the top was a clear cut rock scramble. I LOVE rock scrambling, when I go out for a f#@king ROCK SCRAMBLE not for a 100 mile running race!<br /><br />Foot hold. Hand hold. Foot hold. Slippery mud from the frost overnight that's melted in the sun. Literal movement backwards. Hand hold. Root Hold. Rope Hold.<br />Am I having a heart attack?<br />No you just wish you were so that you'd have an excuse to stop.<br /><br />THE TOP! Shit you've gotta be kidding me. The downhill is so steep that I have to use the ropes on the trail to make my way down the supposedly easier side of this mountain. Only six more miles / ten kms of downhill to go until the final aid station.<br /><br />A10. Mile 90. KM 143<br /><br />They tell me the splits to the three runners in front of me. I laugh in their faces. I grab my supplies reminding myself that I'd still really prefer to finish 4th over 5th, and 5th over 6th, and 6th over 11th. I feel like the finish line is somehow moving further away from me. I detour to the actual aid station and literally twelve volunteers behind the table stand at attention and almost try to 'sell me' on their foods in front of them. They're wonderful. All of the Japanese people have been. Everything in this race save how I've actually run my final twenty miles has been wonderful. I take a slice of orange and everyone celebrates in unison. I realize I'm the first runner that's touched anything outside of my own supplies that my crew has laid out for me. I eat five slices of orange and they count off each and every one. It's comical and heart warming all at once. I thank them in my best broken Japanese and get on with my near but not quite death march to the finish line.<br /><br />It's not the climbing miles that scare me it's the flat and downhill miles as those are where I'll lose the most time to my stalkers.<br /><br />About 45 minutes later,<br />"Eight miles / thirteen kilometers, all downhill"<br /><br />It was toughen up time and I was really struggling to convince myself that this would all be over shortly, and that the faster I ran the sooner it'd end. I walked and shoulder checked more than I care to admit. Then I caught up to the very last runner in the shorter STY race. The three sweepers around him were all but literally sweeping him off course. I detoured his way and threw my arm around him and told him how strong he was, how he was almost home, how everyone would be so proud of him. I knew he wouldn't understand the verbal language but communication and support comes in many forms. He found me on FB two days later and thanked me via google translator. I told him how much he'd helped me without realizing as much. I think in hindsight I was attempting to speak to both of us.<br /><br />The terrain gave way to a steep gravel road descent. I leaned forward under the assumption that inertia would propel me forward and that somewhere tucked away deep inside I actually cared if I fell on my face or not and I'd prevent that from happening by moving my legs faster than they'd moved in hours.<br /><br />I was too close to quit now. Too close to not win 4th place. We passed through a temple at the bottom of our last climb, right before the gravel gave way to pavement. The temple and temple grounds looked impressive and warranted stopping to appreciate them further, at least that was the latest argument that popped into my head as an excuse to stop torturing myself.<br /><br />I could see the finish line now, though it was closer in sight than it was in running distance as we were to run an arc around the lake and across a bridge first. Purgatory. My legs started cramping. I didn't care. One mile. A half mile. A quarter mile. Nothing but cheers and applause. Nothing but smiling faces and positive energy and love. Nothing but pure elation.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Ixu76Qzb-gE/UZHkK7WFgTI/AAAAAAAALNE/S9alLUB7OWg/s1600/D4C_3498.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="266" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Ixu76Qzb-gE/UZHkK7WFgTI/AAAAAAAALNE/S9alLUB7OWg/s400/D4C_3498.JPG" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Photo Credit Shinpei Koseki</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ryNholtgenI/UZHkXdDhLqI/AAAAAAAALNM/KxN0cmbw5cA/s1600/936908_10151349030971666_981452118_n.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ryNholtgenI/UZHkXdDhLqI/AAAAAAAALNM/KxN0cmbw5cA/s320/936908_10151349030971666_981452118_n.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Photo Credit Koichi Iwasa</td></tr></tbody></table>4th place.<br />20h20m.<br />The hardest 100 miler I've ever run.<br />The most talented field of runners I've ever gone up against in a mountainous 100 miler.<br />I couldn't be happier. I couldn't be more proud...in that moment I thought as much, but just sixteen hours and fifteen minutes later I was happier still, I was far more proud.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dcX6WN0xkQ8/UZHhuoSwppI/AAAAAAAALMY/Mnc1BCZuEvk/s1600/2013-04-28+03.34.15-1.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="300" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dcX6WN0xkQ8/UZHhuoSwppI/AAAAAAAALMY/Mnc1BCZuEvk/s400/2013-04-28+03.34.15-1.jpg" width="400" /></a></div><br />Thank you Japan<br />Thank you Kaburaki<br />Thank you amazing UTMF volunteers and organizers<br />Thank you Team Salomon, especially my crew who I could not have succeeded without<br />Thank you Justin Jablonowski and Rich White for hosting/helping me/us in Japan and motivating us to sign up in the first place way back in November<br />Thank you Kim and James for the surprise congratulations decorations upon our return home<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-VbXHPjOADR4/UZHmNvGbukI/AAAAAAAALN0/SoNSRHOow10/s1600/D8C_4790.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-VbXHPjOADR4/UZHmNvGbukI/AAAAAAAALN0/SoNSRHOow10/s320/D8C_4790.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">My amazing crew. Photo Shinpei Koseki</td></tr></tbody></table><br />I sincerely hope to return again and to ideally spend more time in Japan appreciating and exploring the culture and the history further. I've dreamt of going to Japan my entire life. I've dreamt of running an internationally competitive mountainous 100 miler since 2008. I've dreamt of being healthy and at the top of my running game since 2010. I've dreamt of <a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082332/">Entering the Ninja</a> since I was five years old. Three out of four ain't bad I guess, three out of four ain't bad.<br /><br /><div style="text-align: left;"></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-I8i5LF00jbU/UZHkqR88q5I/AAAAAAAALNU/sl_Xit69JiM/s1600/D4C_4083_1.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-I8i5LF00jbU/UZHkqR88q5I/AAAAAAAALNU/sl_Xit69JiM/s320/D4C_4083_1.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Photo Credit Shinpei Koseki</td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Q9-7RLM-pJM/UZHieyNSjAI/AAAAAAAALMo/lWqcsx_6hoQ/s1600/2013-04-28+18.04.54.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><br /><img border="0" height="143" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Q9-7RLM-pJM/UZHieyNSjAI/AAAAAAAALMo/lWqcsx_6hoQ/s400/2013-04-28+18.04.54.JPG" width="400" /></a></div><br />GR<br /><br />PS: I have an athlete page on Facebook now and an online like will help grant you three wishes!<br />If you like <a href="https://www.facebook.com/garyrobbinsrun">this page</a>&nbsp;within the next 24 hours you will find something amazing in your life.<br />If you like <a href="https://www.facebook.com/garyrobbinsrun">this page</a> within the next 12 hours you'll be rich beyond your wildest dreams.<br />If you like <a href="https://www.facebook.com/garyrobbinsrun">this page</a> within the next 6 hours you'll have the skills of a Samurai bestowed upon you in your sleep<br />If you DO NOT like <a href="https://www.facebook.com/garyrobbinsrun">THIS PAGE</a>&nbsp;something you love will be tragically taken from you while the whole horrific incident it is inexplicably live tweeted via my <a href="https://twitter.com/gary_robbins">Twitter feed</a>. Feel free to follow me on Twitter as well, though I'd strongly recommend against it if you don't <a href="https://www.facebook.com/garyrobbinsrun">LIKE THIS PAGE</a>! garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-69560348837737231632013-04-22T08:27:00.000-07:002013-04-22T08:27:53.412-07:00Run Real Fast At UTMF - Music That Matters <br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-rivNJOKhI0w/UXVPg9-J3mI/AAAAAAAALIg/cJ6Qr1yRKow/s1600/IMG_20130421_172452.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="232" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-rivNJOKhI0w/UXVPg9-J3mI/AAAAAAAALIg/cJ6Qr1yRKow/s400/IMG_20130421_172452.JPG" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">The Great Buddha Kamakura - Age 761 Years - Height 13.4 meters - Weight 121 tonnes</td></tr></tbody></table>I've gotten into the habit through my last few long distance runs, usually of 100 miles in length or more, of making a play list called "Run Real Fast At (insert race/fkt attempt here)"<br /><br />Music is a powerful motivator and since 'discovering' its true benefits while running, more specifically during my final 20 miles at Western States 2010, I've set out to become a more educated and engaged listener.<br /><br />I posed the question on Facebook just 24 hours before we departed for Japan,<br /><br />"Name ONE SONG you currently love to run to"<br /><br />There were almost 100 responses and some great insights into what can drive and motivate people while they're out there slogging along. It's clear the majority of us not only love to run to music but we love hearing what others love to listen to as well.<br /><br />I simply ran out of time to even YouTube all the suggestions, let alone download/purchase/upload new music to my UTMF playlist.&nbsp; In the end I added a few newbies to my personal playlist and will look to add more in over time. <br /><br />In the interest of a music sharing style posting I'll continue to do this prior to other big races throughout the year. Hopefully you'll find some new tunes to run to, and please do share your own personal favorites for future reference as well.<br /><br />I should preface this playlist by saying that there's a decent amount of music in here that I'd really never listen to otherwise. Songs such as Gangnam Style, I Know You Want Me, Barbara Streisand, and Welcome To The Jungle may pump me up late in 100 mile efforts but I'd likely turn towards something more along the lines of Alt-J, Tame Impala, Local Natives, Stereophonics, Phoenix, Imagine Dragons, or Mumford &amp; Sons on a daily basis right now.<br /><br />Monarcy Of Roses - Chili Peppers<br />A Tattered Line Of String - Postal Service<br />Junk Of The Heart - The Kooks<br />Juliette - Hollerado<br />Home - Philip Philips<br />Sergio's Trio - DJ Champion<br />Marching Bands Of Manhatten - Death Cab For Cutie<br />Radioactive - Imagine Dragons<br />Burn It Down - Linkin Park<br />Ten Thousand Hours - Macklemore and Lewis<br />ABC Theme Remix - Pendulum<br />Highway To Hell - AC/DC<br />Barbara Streisand - Duck Sauce<br />Time To Run - Lord Huron (thanks Melanie Sakowski)<br />What I Got - Sublime<br />I Will Follow You Into The Dark - Death Cab<br />This Too Shall Pass - OK Go<br />Under The Bridge - Chili Peppers<br />Can't Hold Us - Macklemore and Lewis (thanks Luke and Laura and Anita)<br />You Shook Me All Night Long - AC/DC<br />Enter Sandman - Metallica&nbsp; <br />Bohemian Rhapsody - Queen<br />On Top Of The World - Imagine Dragons<br />Love Like A Sunset - Phoenix<br />How You Like Me Now - The Heavy<br />Thrift Shop - Macklemore and Lewis<br />Stronger - Kanye West<br />Anna Sun - Walk The Moon<br />One More Mile - Paper Tongues (thanks Douglas)<br />The Funeral - Band Of Horses<br />It's Time - Imagine Dragons<br />Money Maker - The Black Keys<br />Reno Chunk - Hollerado<br />Bloodbuzz Ohio - The National<br />In Your Light - Gotye<br />Keep On Ridin - DJ Champion<br />Invincible - OK Go<br />The House That Heaven Built - Japandroids (thanks Ross)<br />Little Lion Man - Mumford &amp; Sons<br />Otherside - Chili Peppers<br />Gangnam Style - PSY<br />Connected - Stereo MC's<br />Bodyrock - Moby <br />Aeroplane - Chili Peppers<br />Fire - Kasabian<br />Entertainment - Phoenix<br />Sacrilege - Yeah Yeah Yeahs<br />Violins and Trambourines - Stereophonics<br />Walk This Walk - Aerosmith &amp; RUN DMC<br />We Are Young - Fun<br />Somewhere Only We Know - Keane (thanks Josh)<br />We Got The Love - I Mother Earth<br />Madness - Muse<br />The Pot - Tool<br />I Know You Want Me - Pitbull<br />King Eternal - TV On The Radio (thanks Ed)<br />Typical - MuteMath<br />Well Thought Out Twinkies - Silversun Pickups<br />Welcome To The Jungle - Guns and Roses<br />It's Tricky - RUN DMC <br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-zUUZi1D31Pk/UXVPlHo51YI/AAAAAAAALIs/e_S7OG-k71I/s1600/IMG_20130421_203832.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="400" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-zUUZi1D31Pk/UXVPlHo51YI/AAAAAAAALIs/e_S7OG-k71I/s400/IMG_20130421_203832.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Incense Offering To The Great Buddha</td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MQvdqA3id7A/UXVPYpMkryI/AAAAAAAALIc/xx2P4HC54zc/s1600/IMG_20130421_172222.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="300" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MQvdqA3id7A/UXVPYpMkryI/AAAAAAAALIc/xx2P4HC54zc/s400/IMG_20130421_172222.JPG" width="400" /></a></div><br />3 days 12 hours and 30 minutes until we head off into the night around Mt. Fuji!<br /><br />GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-79487347702969326002013-04-15T10:04:00.003-07:002013-04-15T10:21:31.708-07:00Up To Here (PhotoBlog) The last six weeks have gone really well. Though I've wanted to blog a bunch and I have numerous postings written in my head, the untold story of being a race director (especially of multiple events now) is that you just generally spend a lot of time working on your computer. Given that I've never held a desk job or anything remotely close to a job that forced me to sit down for any extended period of time, it's been quite the adjustment. I have found that spending so many additional hours working online has effectively quelled my blogging and other 'online for pleasure' ways...ummm, that can be read many, many different ways...being online now for five, six or seven hours a day is effectively three, four, or five hours longer than I'm used to. The motivation to then sit in front of a screen afterwards is lacking to say the least.<br /><br />March was a great month of training. With a late push of 123 miles in the final week I ended up with a 402 mile month.<br /><br />I raced the <a href="http://chuckanut50krace.com/">Chuckanut</a> 50k to a 10 minute PR in the middle of this. Though I was pretty happy with my 4h02m run time, as I was shooting for sub 4hr, I just didn't have my climbing legs with me on the day. My leg turnover held up throughout the race on the faster stuff, my descents were solid as always, but my climbing legs evaporated within the first mile of the first climb and I just had to slog it out and stick with it. I found myself with a pack of runners with about ten miles to go and in the end I finished 14-15 minutes ahead of this group, as the climbing was effectively behind us. It was rewarding to have felt terrible very early on and yet to have stuck with things and plodded through to a respectable result. A result that I can actually celebrate, especially when DNF thoughts nearly overwhelmed me from miles 7-15. I wasn't having my absolute best day but to fight it out and still be satisfied with my overall result made it very rewarding.<br /><br />Last weekend, the week following my 123 mile effort, I managed to shave five full minutes off of my <a href="http://www.diezvista50.ca/DV50/Welcome.html">Diez Vista 50k</a> course record from 2010. A race report is imminent...I hope.<br /><br />From my last blog posting up to here, in pictures;<br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-xwyyBD0KqOk/UWwpcT_-SiI/AAAAAAAALBI/-p57kfVY6p0/s1600/IMG_20130223_162501.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-xwyyBD0KqOk/UWwpcT_-SiI/AAAAAAAALBI/-p57kfVY6p0/s320/IMG_20130223_162501.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">How much is that doggy in the fence?</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_wX7cfou_Io/UWwpf9HVokI/AAAAAAAALBQ/f_t2jROQ8iM/s1600/IMG_20130227_142744.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_wX7cfou_Io/UWwpf9HVokI/AAAAAAAALBQ/f_t2jROQ8iM/s320/IMG_20130227_142744.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Another day atop Dam Mountain. A favorite local route</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xWB8z-e25yY/UWwpgAJI_BI/AAAAAAAALBU/VrULZ5uT7ig/s1600/IMG_20130225_141652.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xWB8z-e25yY/UWwpgAJI_BI/AAAAAAAALBU/VrULZ5uT7ig/s320/IMG_20130225_141652.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">The Green Room</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-G16nW020LyQ/UWwpiB_xcuI/AAAAAAAALBg/Lkj5cjTJPQQ/s1600/IMG_20130227_143148.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-G16nW020LyQ/UWwpiB_xcuI/AAAAAAAALBg/Lkj5cjTJPQQ/s320/IMG_20130227_143148.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">A weekly endeavor, Dam Mountain ascent</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-zYRqzD0_Y7Y/UWwpjExU0sI/AAAAAAAALBo/tnXUCpRIvAA/s1600/IMG_20130301_111903.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-zYRqzD0_Y7Y/UWwpjExU0sI/AAAAAAAALBo/tnXUCpRIvAA/s320/IMG_20130301_111903.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Sometimes in a slightly different light, <br />you end up seeing things in a completely different way</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-No7Fp8zzXJc/UWwpkQuMefI/AAAAAAAALBw/jd6KqfD3kQ8/s1600/IMG_20130228_223747.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-No7Fp8zzXJc/UWwpkQuMefI/AAAAAAAALBw/jd6KqfD3kQ8/s320/IMG_20130228_223747.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">A section of my new race The Cap Crusher 8k/13k</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-7X7z-vX8PVE/UWwpkxWXgOI/AAAAAAAALB0/5YtCxwzr-oM/s1600/IMG_20130303_224525.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-7X7z-vX8PVE/UWwpkxWXgOI/AAAAAAAALB0/5YtCxwzr-oM/s320/IMG_20130303_224525.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Ben Gibbard at WWU</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9w0tWPTEXQ4/UWwpmbqUydI/AAAAAAAALCA/VwBvUxdE04g/s1600/IMG_20130303_144611.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9w0tWPTEXQ4/UWwpmbqUydI/AAAAAAAALCA/VwBvUxdE04g/s320/IMG_20130303_144611.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Awaiting our annual training terrain melt out</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JzCJeNA10DM/UWwpnNtEF3I/AAAAAAAALCI/xN5IwZKM5ZQ/s1600/IMG_20130306_221122.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JzCJeNA10DM/UWwpnNtEF3I/AAAAAAAALCI/xN5IwZKM5ZQ/s320/IMG_20130306_221122.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">The logo for our new race held on 03-23</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hDgbvdTGTX0/UWwpoO8yh2I/AAAAAAAALCQ/k07r6U9aNBM/s1600/IMG_20130304_163204.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hDgbvdTGTX0/UWwpoO8yh2I/AAAAAAAALCQ/k07r6U9aNBM/s320/IMG_20130304_163204.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Running on Chuckanut with Linda</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-JXwi4xvBAZk/UWwppQXuyHI/AAAAAAAALCY/21jiGjt5u9Q/s1600/IMG_20130308_155408.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-JXwi4xvBAZk/UWwppQXuyHI/AAAAAAAALCY/21jiGjt5u9Q/s320/IMG_20130308_155408.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">A three bridge training run</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-m88_7fHEKtw/UWwppiLp-uI/AAAAAAAALCg/d2OOIKKFHHw/s1600/IMG_20130304_195534.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-m88_7fHEKtw/UWwppiLp-uI/AAAAAAAALCg/d2OOIKKFHHw/s320/IMG_20130304_195534.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Linda on the more technical bits of Chuckanut</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BCM1Vkov04s/UWwpqLg_ntI/AAAAAAAALCk/uZpA51wSu0E/s1600/IMG_20130307_212249.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BCM1Vkov04s/UWwpqLg_ntI/AAAAAAAALCk/uZpA51wSu0E/s320/IMG_20130307_212249.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">BCMC a weekly route for me</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-nOrOgj8Ltx4/UWwps7JgsSI/AAAAAAAALCw/oKC9sLbmg-0/s1600/IMG_20130313_154137.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-nOrOgj8Ltx4/UWwps7JgsSI/AAAAAAAALCw/oKC9sLbmg-0/s320/IMG_20130313_154137.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">As much as running in the rain can be challenging,<br />it also leads to some of the most beautiful runs</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-YrREkblBxKo/UWwpsYcubHI/AAAAAAAALC0/d2T8ZnbLXPc/s1600/IMG_20130309_215103.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-YrREkblBxKo/UWwpsYcubHI/AAAAAAAALC0/d2T8ZnbLXPc/s320/IMG_20130309_215103.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Colinoba birthday scavenger hunt in Seattle</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-YpQPfERCtDs/UWwptMFiR9I/AAAAAAAALC8/fTiRHlJn8m8/s1600/IMG_20130311_004233.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-YpQPfERCtDs/UWwptMFiR9I/AAAAAAAALC8/fTiRHlJn8m8/s320/IMG_20130311_004233.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Cougar Mountain outside Seattle</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-XQq5mb2QmMs/UWwptizYfYI/AAAAAAAALDE/NH8Stn4D1OA/s1600/IMG_20130315_095217.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-XQq5mb2QmMs/UWwptizYfYI/AAAAAAAALDE/NH8Stn4D1OA/s320/IMG_20130315_095217.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Logo for our next Coast Mountain Trail Series Race,<br />Buckin' Hell on May 18th</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-7JfWVUgyX0Y/UWwpvi6OcpI/AAAAAAAALDQ/KmowcJTosyw/s1600/IMG_20130314_202312.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-7JfWVUgyX0Y/UWwpvi6OcpI/AAAAAAAALDQ/KmowcJTosyw/s320/IMG_20130314_202312.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Happy Pi Day!</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-620E-AXEDJ8/UWwpwDVh80I/AAAAAAAALDY/3KLAG91o294/s1600/IMG_20130316_153337.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-620E-AXEDJ8/UWwpwDVh80I/AAAAAAAALDY/3KLAG91o294/s320/IMG_20130316_153337.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">My Chuckanut PR</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-U9kcFIqwy-k/UWwpwXzrx5I/AAAAAAAALDc/QqMb8VzQep8/s1600/IMG_20130317_132604.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-U9kcFIqwy-k/UWwpwXzrx5I/AAAAAAAALDc/QqMb8VzQep8/s320/IMG_20130317_132604.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Happy Saint Paddy's Day from the Diez Vista trail</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-5Rqu5o3Eg0I/UWwpxXPXZwI/AAAAAAAALDo/A-hoXr386lg/s1600/IMG_20130321_174526.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-5Rqu5o3Eg0I/UWwpxXPXZwI/AAAAAAAALDo/A-hoXr386lg/s320/IMG_20130321_174526.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Another Dam ascent</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SoEUH9kIuhw/UWwpxv_mDoI/AAAAAAAALDw/A_pCcqafSCM/s1600/IMG_20130318_160449.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-SoEUH9kIuhw/UWwpxv_mDoI/AAAAAAAALDw/A_pCcqafSCM/s320/IMG_20130318_160449.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Starting line of Cap Crusher</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-x8SMF_jnBSE/UWwpyIFkgnI/AAAAAAAALD4/UcqAYnJqdU4/s1600/IMG_20130318_155847.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-x8SMF_jnBSE/UWwpyIFkgnI/AAAAAAAALD4/UcqAYnJqdU4/s320/IMG_20130318_155847.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">No gold</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-G9M0GfLzR54/UWwp0da12NI/AAAAAAAALEA/kWBxx5LpsI0/s1600/IMG_20130321_175053.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-G9M0GfLzR54/UWwp0da12NI/AAAAAAAALEA/kWBxx5LpsI0/s320/IMG_20130321_175053.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Dam Mountain</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-VDzhmQrsFyw/UWwp0rGKD-I/AAAAAAAALEE/PCRKF8BOhj4/s1600/IMG_20130321_174848.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-VDzhmQrsFyw/UWwp0rGKD-I/AAAAAAAALEE/PCRKF8BOhj4/s320/IMG_20130321_174848.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Grouse Mountain Snowshoe Grind,<br />ie Dam Mountain</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LC6aiVDfUks/UWwp09hLkKI/AAAAAAAALEM/USlYdK1jwyw/s1600/IMG_20130322_183212.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LC6aiVDfUks/UWwp09hLkKI/AAAAAAAALEM/USlYdK1jwyw/s320/IMG_20130322_183212.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Cleveland Dam with The Lions in the distance</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-nKeNeNpIrRY/UWwp1POPypI/AAAAAAAALEQ/yB5Pn4DZY8k/s1600/IMG_20130326_113241.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-nKeNeNpIrRY/UWwp1POPypI/AAAAAAAALEQ/yB5Pn4DZY8k/s320/IMG_20130326_113241.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">A surprise gift, the new glow in the dark Canadian quarters!</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-RDsThrij7ys/UWwp1oRKzVI/AAAAAAAALEc/7wfpunejT6s/s1600/IMG_20130327_223057.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-RDsThrij7ys/UWwp1oRKzVI/AAAAAAAALEc/7wfpunejT6s/s320/IMG_20130327_223057.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Hiding on a trail in Squamish</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-tODka46WsU4/UWwp4eXLL8I/AAAAAAAALEo/Xtw3oZbQ078/s1600/IMG_20130327_223502.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-tODka46WsU4/UWwp4eXLL8I/AAAAAAAALEo/Xtw3oZbQ078/s320/IMG_20130327_223502.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">The Dream Wizards are responsible for all that is great in<br />the Squamish trail networks</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Eu-Kquatp6o/UWwp4nupNwI/AAAAAAAALEs/xNMPYrIZTP8/s1600/IMG_20130327_223945.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Eu-Kquatp6o/UWwp4nupNwI/AAAAAAAALEs/xNMPYrIZTP8/s320/IMG_20130327_223945.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">View from Survival Of The Fittest course in Squamish</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eGH8glVLzXs/UWwp4kw9ukI/AAAAAAAALEw/h6KD4sRafg8/s1600/IMG_20130329_121618.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-eGH8glVLzXs/UWwp4kw9ukI/AAAAAAAALEw/h6KD4sRafg8/s320/IMG_20130329_121618.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Dam Mountain</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-SWHHnBWPkzE/UWwp6M0w7hI/AAAAAAAALFA/VajGB9TotHs/s1600/IMG_20130330_154638.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-SWHHnBWPkzE/UWwp6M0w7hI/AAAAAAAALFA/VajGB9TotHs/s320/IMG_20130330_154638.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">A 50k PR on a training run</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ovoiyxoPf1E/UWwp7h0qGdI/AAAAAAAALFI/C9FCsf-qCX0/s1600/IMG_20130329_121952.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ovoiyxoPf1E/UWwp7h0qGdI/AAAAAAAALFI/C9FCsf-qCX0/s320/IMG_20130329_121952.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Dam Mountain with Adam Campbell</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AnRi6ZZxImA/UWwp72CtiqI/AAAAAAAALFM/xNVjRcKaHeU/s1600/IMG_20130329_122759.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AnRi6ZZxImA/UWwp72CtiqI/AAAAAAAALFM/xNVjRcKaHeU/s320/IMG_20130329_122759.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">A city turned upside down in the ocean</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qHtFA314nXM/UWwp74vuJEI/AAAAAAAALFU/0Gc7mtBqI7o/s1600/IMG_20130331_075544.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qHtFA314nXM/UWwp74vuJEI/AAAAAAAALFU/0Gc7mtBqI7o/s320/IMG_20130331_075544.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Happy Easter!</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-20c-Wrnv5RM/UWwp9U5DPvI/AAAAAAAALFg/IQHhf6luTWA/s1600/IMG_20130331_202520.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-20c-Wrnv5RM/UWwp9U5DPvI/AAAAAAAALFg/IQHhf6luTWA/s320/IMG_20130331_202520.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Squamish</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Do1q6wL_n84/UWwp_OcEvNI/AAAAAAAALFo/LUzDOuNhBG8/s1600/IMG_20130331_201330.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Do1q6wL_n84/UWwp_OcEvNI/AAAAAAAALFo/LUzDOuNhBG8/s320/IMG_20130331_201330.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Roxy testing her new gear</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-bS06wqLhjCk/UWwp_-OeO6I/AAAAAAAALFw/1DXD1OQ2kCc/s1600/IMG_20130331_201811.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-bS06wqLhjCk/UWwp_-OeO6I/AAAAAAAALFw/1DXD1OQ2kCc/s320/IMG_20130331_201811.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Linda with sunshine coming out of her bum</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-6AJgNjx6FNg/UWwp_-M6e-I/AAAAAAAALF0/XI1bqe1QTcA/s1600/IMG_20130403_205332.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-6AJgNjx6FNg/UWwp_-M6e-I/AAAAAAAALF0/XI1bqe1QTcA/s320/IMG_20130403_205332.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Logo for Coast Mountain Trail Series race,<br />Survival Of The Fittest 13k/18k</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yRV7JEBOQEE/UWwqAGMQf7I/AAAAAAAALF4/s5938PYn_Uc/s1600/IMG_20130401_205558.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yRV7JEBOQEE/UWwqAGMQf7I/AAAAAAAALF4/s5938PYn_Uc/s320/IMG_20130401_205558.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">View of Garibaldi from Stump Lake in Squamish</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-bQCgS7x6diU/UWwqCiWwsdI/AAAAAAAALGI/VFI0BRxpeW8/s1600/IMG_20130407_164829.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-bQCgS7x6diU/UWwqCiWwsdI/AAAAAAAALGI/VFI0BRxpeW8/s320/IMG_20130407_164829.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Congrats from Salomon West Van on DV CR</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Asg8e0RShpc/UWwqDKEukxI/AAAAAAAALGQ/BNDb8-sdr40/s1600/IMG_20130406_202025.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Asg8e0RShpc/UWwqDKEukxI/AAAAAAAALGQ/BNDb8-sdr40/s320/IMG_20130406_202025.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">A new course record</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-TpZ2IqOVBmo/UWwqDLw8F2I/AAAAAAAALGU/OJMbZ7IwAkY/s1600/IMG_20130409_205747.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-TpZ2IqOVBmo/UWwqDLw8F2I/AAAAAAAALGU/OJMbZ7IwAkY/s320/IMG_20130409_205747.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Coming up quick!!</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Eck7dRqgcTM/UWwqFLLAJQI/AAAAAAAALGg/az04xNrc4pc/s1600/IMG_20130410_143239.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Eck7dRqgcTM/UWwqFLLAJQI/AAAAAAAALGg/az04xNrc4pc/s320/IMG_20130410_143239.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">A trot in Stanley Park</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-mupYZn769F4/UWwqF6UsSlI/AAAAAAAALGo/uhYH0VagFyA/s1600/IMG_20130410_142932.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-mupYZn769F4/UWwqF6UsSlI/AAAAAAAALGo/uhYH0VagFyA/s320/IMG_20130410_142932.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Where the sun eventually broke through</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-u5VFqMBl1eE/UWwqG3jTu6I/AAAAAAAALGw/rj6LpaD2nx8/s1600/IMG_20130413_185027.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-u5VFqMBl1eE/UWwqG3jTu6I/AAAAAAAALGw/rj6LpaD2nx8/s320/IMG_20130413_185027.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">How to get noticed at Whole Foods</td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vDlWQos-LGk/UWwqG83JsHI/AAAAAAAALG0/qj_Df4huhpo/s1600/IMG_20130413_185228.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vDlWQos-LGk/UWwqG83JsHI/AAAAAAAALG0/qj_Df4huhpo/s320/IMG_20130413_185228.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">A walk in the city after an all you can eat sushi<br />night entertaining friends from out of town</td></tr></tbody></table>We fly out for Japan and <a href="http://www.ultratrailmtfuji.com/en/">UTMF</a> in just four days time!!<br /><br />GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com5tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-80840124752739926292013-02-24T16:34:00.001-08:002013-02-27T22:22:37.316-08:00Music To My Ears <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-pmqD7ibsde8/USqvK7lRjyI/AAAAAAAAJs4/7j6zzuVhX-Y/s1600/Talk+Ultra.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-pmqD7ibsde8/USqvK7lRjyI/AAAAAAAAJs4/7j6zzuVhX-Y/s320/Talk+Ultra.jpg" width="320" /></a></div>I was recently interviewed for <a href="http://iancorless.org/2013/02/22/episode-29-robbins-bragg-grant-corbett/" target="_blank">Talk Ultra</a> and it went live on Friday. <a href="http://iancorless.org/2013/02/22/episode-29-robbins-bragg-grant-corbett/">Here's the link</a> with full podcast details. As it lists in the Show Notes I pick up the mic at around 2h30m into the show.<br /><br />I've never been one to train or run with music, though I love music, strive to discover new artists on a regular basis and attend at least five or six live shows a year. Music is a big part of my life, yet it has never effectively made it into my running on anything near a regular basis. The main reason behind this is that I've simply never had success in any of my running with music experiments. The last time I recall running with music prior to 2013 was during the final 20 miles of my WS100 2010 run. The music made a huge difference in helping to block out the pain and I do believe it allowed me to close out stronger than I would have otherwise, yet my setup was still marginally frustrating and it never migrated into my regular running routine.<br /><br />Heading into the HURT 100 last month I really wanted the ability to zone out over the final 20 mile loop and I knew from experience what an asset music could be in this regard. I started searching through online running with music forums and write ups and sure enough there has been a slight technological shift in how you can effectively run with music these days. My primary issue in the past has always revolved around the wires and how to effectively cut down on the annoyance of the bouncing and frustration of the tangling.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-2u0xQt84nqg/USqvTuD0RFI/AAAAAAAAJtA/L2jqEA8QG5k/s1600/Jaybird-JF3-Freedom-Bluetooth.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="210" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-2u0xQt84nqg/USqvTuD0RFI/AAAAAAAAJtA/L2jqEA8QG5k/s320/Jaybird-JF3-Freedom-Bluetooth.jpg" width="320" /></a></div>Though we don't yet have hoverboards in our daily lives the integration of bluetooth technology has slightly revolutionized the listening experience. After a few hours of disseminating information I made the decision to break the golden rule. I was going to purchase new items that I wasn't going to get a chance to train with. I was going to effectively trust in the reviews I'd read and head into my final lap at HURT with a completely new system that I had yet to properly test. (it arrived the day before we departed for Hawaii and I ran with it for a total of 30 minutes in advance of the race)<br /><br />The <a href="http://www.jaybirdgear.com/freedom-bluetooth-headphones/" target="_blank">Jaybird Freedom</a> bluetooth headphones promised a lifetime warranty against sweat, but more importantly they offered up to 6 hours of battery life and cost less than $100. The reviews were pretty much unanimous that these were leading the way in the bluetooth headphone charge.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-23lQTw9tK6o/USqvcfZUtRI/AAAAAAAAJtI/YDFmcAeD8IY/s1600/Nano.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="211" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-23lQTw9tK6o/USqvcfZUtRI/AAAAAAAAJtI/YDFmcAeD8IY/s320/Nano.jpg" width="320" /></a></div>I didn't want to simply carry my bulky smartphone, so next I sourced the smallest bluetooth enabled music player and it didn't take long to settle on the brand new <a href="http://www.apple.com/ipod-nano/" target="_blank">iPod Nano</a>, even though I had recently happily migrated away from Apple based products. At $149 for 16gigs it seemed reasonably priced and it was incredibly compact and exactly what I was looking for.<br /><br />I rather blindly trusted that my own research combined with the manufacturer claims, along with the reviews I'd read, would be accurate enough to at least get me through my final HURT lap without any major issues. Sure enough and thankfully so everything performed amicably on race day and I got away with my breaking of the cardinal rule in ultra running.<br /><br />Since HURT it's been a bit of a treat to incorporate music into my personal running experience as I've always &nbsp;desired to do. Typically right now I'll use music on one or two of my runs a week, usually on days where motivation may be lacking, or on days where I'm looking to run at a hard pace and where I know music will help push me along.<br /><br />Today I got to listen to my first Talk Ultra podcast while running and it worked perfectly as a distraction tactic to help me focus on my twenty mile run more than the shitty-ass weather of the day. I was almost an hour into my run before I even looked at my watch or processed that I was already sopping wet with a few hours of running left to go.<br /><br />Music and podcasts are a highly effective way to keep motivation high or help bolster motivation when it may be lagging far, far behind you.<br /><br />So I'm curious, do you listen to music or podcast when you run? If so what kinds of music or podcasts and what type of setup do you use or prefer?<br /><br />I hope you enjoy the interview. I really like what Ian and Talk Ultra are doing for the sport and it was an absolute pleasure to get a chance to tell my story a little in front of what I know is a very diverse international listener base.<br /><br />As a side note, some other long term ultra running goals that I failed to touch on near the end of our talk include:<br /><br />-FKT attempt on <a href="http://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvisit/the-wonderland-trail.htm" target="_blank">Wonderland Trail</a> around Mount Rainier<br />-A possible larger volcano based multi day running journey in WA State<br />-FKT attempt on entire <a href="http://www.pcta.org/" target="_blank">Pacific Crest Trail</a>&nbsp;which stretches from Mexico to Canada and finishes/begins in the park where Linda and I are getting married later this year<br />-FKT attempt on the <a href="http://www.bcadventure.com/adventure/explore/high_country/trails/steinvalley.htm" target="_blank">Stein Valley</a> route in BC north of Whistler<br />-<a href="http://hardrock100.com/">Hardrock 100</a><br />-<a href="http://www.tordesgeants.it/" target="_blank">Tour Des Geants</a> in Italy<br />-<a href="http://www.run100s.com/gs.htm" target="_blank">Grand Slam of Ultra Running</a><br /><br /><br /><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="405" scrolling="no" src="http://app.strava.com/activities/42158370/embed/b165d4612181490673dfbc830e88cce68d9e2cd5" width="450"></iframe> GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com11tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-59109778878016245492013-02-16T16:49:00.000-08:002013-02-16T18:12:13.787-08:00My New Mantra <table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-pYb-M-7VF7o/USAgxVA1CmI/AAAAAAAAJsY/WVd8QBBW7eY/s1600/2013-02-16+15.01.36.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-pYb-M-7VF7o/USAgxVA1CmI/AAAAAAAAJsY/WVd8QBBW7eY/s320/2013-02-16+15.01.36.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">New for 2013, Salomon Sense Mantra - my favorite!</td></tr></tbody></table>A mantra I started using in late 2012 was 'fight'. That's it. Just that one word. Fight.<br /><br />I started using this for the first time during the Mountain Masochist 50 miler in early November. It was my third time running the race and there were some climbs that had forced me into power hiking during my previous two times on the course. I knew I was trained and ready to race, and that I should be able to finally run the majority of those climbs. My goal was sub 7 hours which I feel I would have run had there not been snow on the course, and of course had I not detoured for almost six additional miles. Anyways, during those climbs I still had to fight my tendencies towards power hiking. I still had to convince myself in those moments that I had it in me to run terrain I'd never run before.<br /><br />I simply chanted in my head "Fight, fight, fight...fight, fight, fight" and low and behold I forced myself up and over the steepest parts of the course faster than I'd ever done so before. It wasn't easy, but it isn't supposed to be. Fight.<br /><br />I've never been one for mantras, but for me, this simple word sums it all up perfectly. It was a long few years fighting through injury. It was difficult to fight through the lack of confidence in my own abilities after being down for so long. I had to fight day in and day out to stay motivated during my own training and to believe that I would get back to where I once was.<br /><br />When you line up at a race you're out there to fight against the course, against the weather conditions, against the competition, and most of all against your own internal dialogue and weaknesses. You have to fight through all of this to stay focused if you want to get the most out of yourself come race day. For me recently, it's come down to simply reminding myself that it's not supposed to be easy. To achieve your absolute best, you're going to have to learn how to fight, and the hardest battle we all wage is against ourselves and right inside our own minds.<br /><br />"The mind is weak. The body is a machine. Control your mind and your body will be forced to follow."<br /><br />One other Mantra I've acquired recently has already lead to happy feet and fun times on our local trails. My favorite new shoe! The Salomon Sense Mantra.<br /><br />Here's <a href="http://running.competitor.com/2012/10/video/shoe-talk-salomon-sense-mantra_60963" target="_blank">A quick video review on competitor magazine</a><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div>I had my very first run in these shoes today, and I absolutely loved how they hugged my midfoot while giving me ample room in the toe box. This is known as ENDOFIT which is a Salomon exclusive technology. It's an internal fit sleeve designed to hug the forefoot and improve feedback and foot wrapping. Along with this the drop is but 6mm, which I'm a big fan of. 16mm in the rear and 10mm in the front. This is not a minimalist shoe but I'm not a minimalist runner.<br /><br />The Mantra is based on the S-Lab sense that Kilian wore during his 2011 winning run at Western States.<br /><br />"The Mantra adds only a few essentials to make it friendly for everyday running; a little more cushioning, a little more protection, and a longer OS tendon to return more energy.<br />Natural motion construction for running has a lower heel drop, supporting a midfoot or forefoot-oriented stike, better enabling muscles to absorb more shock instead of joints and ultimately building greater balance and overall running efficiency."<br /><br />My debut in the Mantra via STRAVA. A brand new shoe for 2013 and it already owns some of the KOM's on The North Shore:)<br /><br /><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="305" scrolling="no" src="http://app.strava.com/activities/41152650/embed/6ada83ac7be21b3d7dcabbc6b43245b01231ee6d" width="450"></iframe><br /><br />GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com10tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-17441160682296243522013-02-08T13:37:00.001-08:002013-02-08T13:37:02.633-08:00Hibernating 101 <div><div dir="ltr">After three full weeks away from running I'm chomping at the bit to get back at it again.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Why three full weeks off this early in the season you may ask?</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Well basically my season breaks down to HURT which happened on Jan 19th, then UTMF which at 156km is all but 100 miles, on April 26th, and finally UTMB at 168km on August 30th. My goal is to do well at all of these races, to stay healthy throughout the year, and to learn from past mistakes. </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">After HURT in 2010 I went straight back into training the following weekend as I was riding the high of a successful race. Within the month however I got sick, and I stayed sick for the better part of four weeks. When I recovered from that flu I hit it hard in preparation for the 2010 Miwok 100km on May 1st. I was unknowingly well on my way to my first ever DNF and a forced month off of training as I was suffering from over training symptoms and iron levels that were border line anemic. </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Tracking back further than this, while trying to establish a pattern here, in 2007 after my adventure racing team returned to Canada from a successful expedition race in Baja, Mexico, where we'd slept just 90 minutes in 72 hours before snagging an unofficial 2nd place overall (a much longer story as to the unofficial part). I was also riding a high from that experience and I got back to serious training within days. Three weeks later and I was so sick that I ended up with&nbsp;bronchitis&nbsp;which seriously compromised the following two months of training and impacted my entire summer.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">As I sit here closing in on the end of my forced three weeks of downtime I am indeed fighting a minor head cold, though <i>minor</i> being the main word here. Had I not scheduled in this downtime I would surely have ended up decently sick for a month or more. I can't afford to lose time to illness this year, just as I can't afford to lose time to injury. Dare I say that I might just be learning from past experiences here.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Following HURT my body surprised me in the fact that it was definitely the best I've ever felt post 100 mile run, heck I didn't even lose any toenails this time, which I was almost looking forward to:) I very easily could have gone about training within six to seven days and though I know better I could have successfully raced the Orcas Island 50km race on Feb 2nd, where I decided to volunteer and drink beer instead.&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0lDhQGOtUgU/URVtX_MsTVI/AAAAAAAAJq8/AuYGiTjogjc/s1600/2013-02-03+13.56.41.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="191" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0lDhQGOtUgU/URVtX_MsTVI/AAAAAAAAJq8/AuYGiTjogjc/s320/2013-02-03+13.56.41.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Jamshid showing off the greatest ping pong table ever made</td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-aLrZISbMDng/URVtj8w19NI/AAAAAAAAJrE/6ipHIYLy_T8/s1600/2013-02-02+15.02.20.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-aLrZISbMDng/URVtj8w19NI/AAAAAAAAJrE/6ipHIYLy_T8/s320/2013-02-02+15.02.20.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">The view from atop Mt. Constitution</td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Hj9ThTsT-b8/URVtsODSqvI/AAAAAAAAJrM/EOYQw-_r8W4/s1600/2013-02-02+08.31.15.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Hj9ThTsT-b8/URVtsODSqvI/AAAAAAAAJrM/EOYQw-_r8W4/s320/2013-02-02+08.31.15.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Starters shot</td></tr></tbody></table><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">In the 19 days since my 100 I believe I've run a half a dozen times, and 50% of those have been with my run clinic that I help coach at <a href="http://www.northshoreathletics.com/" target="_blank">NSA</a> on Tuesday nights, which is to say I didn't have a say in the matter:) My longest run has been all of five miles and my total mileage is probably 30 miles...actually it's less than 30 miles, wow. All that to say, I ain't kidding when I write that I've effectively shut it down for the better part of a month.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I am confident I've made the right decision though, and for a few reasons, predominantly because I'm pretty fired up to get back to training again. As of Monday Feb 11th there will be exactly 75 days until my next 100 miler, the UTMF in Japan. I'll likely start off with a 50 mile week to ease back into things and follow that up with 60 and then 75-85 mile weeks depending on how things progress. All in all I feel great right now and am somewhat impressed with myself in the fact that I put a plan to paper, in terms of scheduling in this rest period, and I've actually stuck to it without issue.&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">It's time to get back to work again though, and I couldn't be more excited about the path that lays ahead. It's time to start dreaming about racing in Japan!!</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">GR</div></div> garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com5tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-70321695947512723142013-02-06T22:19:00.001-08:002013-02-07T09:34:54.982-08:00Guest Speaker - VIMFF Sunday Feb 10th <div><p dir="ltr">This Sunday February 10th I'll be a featured speaker at the Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival's "Trail Running Show"</p><p dir="ltr">Gary Robbins: Fueled By Cheese &#8211; Trail Running in the Alps</p><p dir="ltr">VIMFF Trail Running Show<br>Sunday, February 10, 7:30 pm (doors 6:30 pm)<br>Centennial Theatre MAP<br>Buy Tickets Here - www.VIMFF.org</p><p dir="ltr">The Ultra Trail Du Mont Blanc (UTMB) is a 168km lap around the 4800 meter Mont Blanc, the highest summit in the Alps. Along the course runners have to overcome more than 9600 meters of elevation gain and loss while travelling through three countries to beat a 46 hour cutoff. With 2300 runners from 60 different countries, the UTMB is often referred to as the default world 100-mile running championships. It has continually attracted the best runners on the planet since its inception in 2003.<br>In August of 2012, North Vancouver ultramarathon runner Gary Robbins went to Chamonix, France to compete in the UTMB.&#160; In his 20-minute presentation, Gary will share his ups and downs and detail why he feels that the loop around the Mont Blanc massif is a journey that every fit and adventurous soul needs to add to their bucket list.</p><p dir="ltr">Tickets are still available and are $19 in advance and $21 at the door, however, consider yourself warned that last year's trail running evening did sell out in advance of the night.</p><p dir="ltr">It would be great to see you out if you happen to be in town. Check out the full line up of films on the evening. It's sure to be a fun one!</p><p dir="ltr">GR</p><br/><img src='http://lh3.ggpht.com/-XCW3DdCVx0c/URPlsmiZ8AI/AAAAAAAAJqU/MtQYNBR1GWI/CameraZOOM-20130207092935871.jpg' /><br/><img src='http://lh4.ggpht.com/-TulWowXOMxw/URPlvKfgrcI/AAAAAAAAJqc/2qvghhn1K_c/CameraZOOM-20130207092846569.jpg' /></div> garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-69549240507120048922013-02-06T17:21:00.002-08:002013-02-06T17:21:52.043-08:00HURT 100 Race Report My HURT 100 race report was hosted over on iRunFar.com, in case you missed it <a href="http://www.irunfar.com/2013/01/gary-robbins-hurt-100-race-report.html" target="_blank">here's the link</a><br /><br />A few images from the race and some of our adventures post race<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1ok9LDgf-vs/URMBLU32sZI/AAAAAAAAJnI/2uvOYRCOQY4/s1600/2013-01-26+11.38.43.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1ok9LDgf-vs/URMBLU32sZI/AAAAAAAAJnI/2uvOYRCOQY4/s320/2013-01-26+11.38.43.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Kv3_ehY25dQ/URMBLsCvyyI/AAAAAAAAJnM/7i_t81OLUN8/s1600/2013-01-30+22.23.29.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Kv3_ehY25dQ/URMBLsCvyyI/AAAAAAAAJnM/7i_t81OLUN8/s320/2013-01-30+22.23.29.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-mWieVlBNYeU/URMBMGDX5YI/AAAAAAAAJnU/vN0JoeyAogg/s1600/20130119_HURT100_5D2_3642.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-mWieVlBNYeU/URMBMGDX5YI/AAAAAAAAJnU/vN0JoeyAogg/s320/20130119_HURT100_5D2_3642.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-VkE4QOmtSBs/URMBMzPICGI/AAAAAAAAJng/-L4HYdi9cNs/s1600/20130119_HURT100_5D2_4179.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-VkE4QOmtSBs/URMBMzPICGI/AAAAAAAAJng/-L4HYdi9cNs/s320/20130119_HURT100_5D2_4179.jpg" width="213" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-lFGh6ljS55c/URMBNDlYv7I/AAAAAAAAJno/5EHWqNECX_E/s1600/20130119_HURT100_5D2_4552.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-lFGh6ljS55c/URMBNDlYv7I/AAAAAAAAJno/5EHWqNECX_E/s320/20130119_HURT100_5D2_4552.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-3vRZUy4-gx0/URMBN7_VpzI/AAAAAAAAJn0/YJJECZek5FE/s1600/20130119_HURT100_5D2_4895.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-3vRZUy4-gx0/URMBN7_VpzI/AAAAAAAAJn0/YJJECZek5FE/s320/20130119_HURT100_5D2_4895.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--x3XFgBAyyY/URMBOunwtbI/AAAAAAAAJn8/Xj1HOZyAO4U/s1600/20130119_HURT100_T3i_2970.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="197" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--x3XFgBAyyY/URMBOunwtbI/AAAAAAAAJn8/Xj1HOZyAO4U/s320/20130119_HURT100_T3i_2970.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-7EcCpeCttwA/URMBOsJjHNI/AAAAAAAAJoA/vfXXPG5pteQ/s1600/20130119_HURT100_T3i_2550.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-7EcCpeCttwA/URMBOsJjHNI/AAAAAAAAJoA/vfXXPG5pteQ/s320/20130119_HURT100_T3i_2550.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RgtViIpLNZk/URMBOwYQj3I/AAAAAAAAJoE/QAlRLqN08Tk/s1600/20130119_HURT100_T3i_3222.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="211" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RgtViIpLNZk/URMBOwYQj3I/AAAAAAAAJoE/QAlRLqN08Tk/s320/20130119_HURT100_T3i_3222.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-sY2sA9Gn6Fg/URMBP1mobPI/AAAAAAAAJoY/Cp0gBR_JAhA/s1600/20130119_HURT100_T3i_3225.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-sY2sA9Gn6Fg/URMBP1mobPI/AAAAAAAAJoY/Cp0gBR_JAhA/s320/20130119_HURT100_T3i_3225.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qbOVrb5ZSgc/URMBP-BqxNI/AAAAAAAAJoc/i4mI3Ty0pyk/s1600/20130119_HURT100_T3i_3970.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qbOVrb5ZSgc/URMBP-BqxNI/AAAAAAAAJoc/i4mI3Ty0pyk/s320/20130119_HURT100_T3i_3970.jpg" width="212" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Hj5Mz5kECDU/URMBQOOzO8I/AAAAAAAAJog/tsZkGLEsCk4/s1600/20130119_HURT100_T3i_3231.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Hj5Mz5kECDU/URMBQOOzO8I/AAAAAAAAJog/tsZkGLEsCk4/s320/20130119_HURT100_T3i_3231.jpg" width="213" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-tgs2lSaQd44/URMBQpIB1kI/AAAAAAAAJoo/uNSLPXyR9-A/s1600/HURT+Win+2013.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-tgs2lSaQd44/URMBQpIB1kI/AAAAAAAAJoo/uNSLPXyR9-A/s320/HURT+Win+2013.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-BEodTS3rRH4/URMBRZoyJtI/AAAAAAAAJow/DG_uS5e4_D0/s1600/HURT+souvenirs.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-BEodTS3rRH4/URMBRZoyJtI/AAAAAAAAJow/DG_uS5e4_D0/s320/HURT+souvenirs.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Fais43oH5nQ/URMBUyhyFyI/AAAAAAAAJpA/GwQV6LpYZnU/s1600/IMG_20130125_190313.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Fais43oH5nQ/URMBUyhyFyI/AAAAAAAAJpA/GwQV6LpYZnU/s320/IMG_20130125_190313.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-tS-44NuzYFc/URMBUxtQunI/AAAAAAAAJpE/SQWBiQh-YXE/s1600/IMG_20130125_190913.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-tS-44NuzYFc/URMBUxtQunI/AAAAAAAAJpE/SQWBiQh-YXE/s320/IMG_20130125_190913.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-WVfDSETp3X0/URMBVaEFtRI/AAAAAAAAJpI/Hp9tMCLYB5o/s1600/IMG_20130125_185955.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-WVfDSETp3X0/URMBVaEFtRI/AAAAAAAAJpI/Hp9tMCLYB5o/s320/IMG_20130125_185955.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0AcZe6UaAbo/URMBVhdByKI/AAAAAAAAJpM/Cc8B_0stxvU/s1600/IMG_20130127_171622.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0AcZe6UaAbo/URMBVhdByKI/AAAAAAAAJpM/Cc8B_0stxvU/s320/IMG_20130127_171622.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-9FILAZowavo/URMBWEWMzYI/AAAAAAAAJpY/NXETVTnjsSo/s1600/P1040324.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="228" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-9FILAZowavo/URMBWEWMzYI/AAAAAAAAJpY/NXETVTnjsSo/s320/P1040324.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-dPQvc8Tlp_0/URMBWT7Cg3I/AAAAAAAAJpc/DSnlvZySRFk/s1600/Photo+Credit+John+Salmonson.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-dPQvc8Tlp_0/URMBWT7Cg3I/AAAAAAAAJpc/DSnlvZySRFk/s320/Photo+Credit+John+Salmonson.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-SRUoT6eWfxo/URMBWxGMDaI/AAAAAAAAJpk/zcgx6gPf7J4/s1600/Photo+Credit+Willy+Woo.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-SRUoT6eWfxo/URMBWxGMDaI/AAAAAAAAJpk/zcgx6gPf7J4/s320/Photo+Credit+Willy+Woo.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-SBxaKeq90bw/URMBWb1pY2I/AAAAAAAAJpo/NN1zRxfE2J4/s1600/P1120237.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-SBxaKeq90bw/URMBWb1pY2I/AAAAAAAAJpo/NN1zRxfE2J4/s320/P1120237.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-cJjVJmT86vc/URMBNJc3lDI/AAAAAAAAJnk/wpAEzMJdNTM/s1600/20130119_HURT100_5D2_4181.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-cJjVJmT86vc/URMBNJc3lDI/AAAAAAAAJnk/wpAEzMJdNTM/s320/20130119_HURT100_5D2_4181.jpg" width="213" /></a></div><br />GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-65969950013205012812013-01-18T00:36:00.001-08:002013-01-18T01:31:39.554-08:00HURT Follow Along + Current Course Conditions <div><p dir="ltr">You can follow along on the live webcast on Sat as of 6am Hawaii time (two hours behind PST). Umm, I'm using a tablet app to post this and I can't seem to link specifically to the webcast, here's the address that you may have to copy and past to get it to go: http://www.ultralive.net/hurt100/webcast.php</p><p dir="ltr">In terms of how I feel and where I'm at, all in all I think it's hard to arrive at a January 100 miler in better health and fitness than I currently find myself. Hopefully that means something come race day.</p><p dir="ltr">I got out on the course for about an hour today and it seems to be drying out quickly. Recent first hand reports had the course in rather rough shape after quite a wet late Dec and early Jan. During today's run it was certainly slick in sections, and it would run much more challenging than the last few years however, as has been mentioned to me by a few locals now, with any wind and no rain in the next 31 hours we could in fact find it to be in prime condition come 6am Saturday. Either way, whatever is presented to us, I'm incredibly excited and thankful to be able to step back onto the HURT course one more time. I'll actually have to run right past the spot where I last broke my foot, ten times throughout the race, and I am 100% certain that I'l recognize exactly where it all went down. It's been quite a journey these last few years and as I sit here tonight, blogging when I should be sleeping, it is with anxious excitement to get back out onto what truly are some of my favorite trails in the world.</p><p dir="ltr">As you follow along here's a reference point as to how I ran the race back in 2010. I'll be straight and say that I'm hoping to run as close to this as possible, maybe even a wee bit faster if conditions and my legs allow for it. It looks to be one of the more competitive fields they've seen here at HURT, yet another reason to get excited about race day!</p><p dir="ltr">Alright, here's a few pictures if they'll post, then off to catch up on some zzzzz</p><p dir="ltr">Jan 16th, 2010</p><p dir="ltr">Lap 1: 3h40m <br>Lap 2: 3h42m<br>Lap 3: 4h04m<br>Lap 4: 4h15m<br>Lap 5: 4h31m<br>-------------<br>20h12m</p><p dir="ltr"><b>Sections</b></p><p dir="ltr">1) Start to Paradise / Manoa<br>1h22<br>1h22<br>1h28<br>1h34<br>1h42</p><p dir="ltr">2) Paradise / Manoa to Nuuanu<br>59m<br>1h01m<br>1h10m<br>1h11m<br>1h15m</p><p dir="ltr">3) Nuuanu to Nature Center<br>1h19m<br>1h19m<br>1h26m<br>1h30m<br>1h34m</p><p dir="ltr">Wish me luck,<br>GR</p><br/><img src='http://lh6.ggpht.com/-TLAilZ-n318/UPkWJiGCA1I/AAAAAAAAI7s/yv4cMUXip3U/IMG_20130117_114639.jpg' /><br/><img src='http://lh3.ggpht.com/-MrU_xnkhG9A/UPkWKwMWXrI/AAAAAAAAI70/IVcY4f73q6A/2013-01-17%25252014.36.39-4.JPG' /><br/><img src='http://lh6.ggpht.com/-NQlMPo6q45I/UPkWPou27BI/AAAAAAAAI78/Kxi9DnZkjFo/IMG_20130117_194827.jpg' /><br/><img src='http://lh3.ggpht.com/-NGyPgSLSzgo/UPkWShRPmrI/AAAAAAAAI8E/vgqU9eWbi9g/IMG_20130117_194432.jpg' /><br/><img src='http://lh3.ggpht.com/-1HgL_FUArpY/UPkWXNXxEgI/AAAAAAAAI8M/buUu8F8mTEM/IMG_20130117_210700.jpg' /><br/><img src='http://lh6.ggpht.com/-ZNWJxLObxP0/UPkWYKdQqfI/AAAAAAAAI8U/cSrtGjk6ZT8/IMG_20130117_210339.jpg' /><br/><img src='http://lh6.ggpht.com/-EsDZkq9NFXE/UPkWcKE4n3I/AAAAAAAAI8c/lJNiKIqRZMQ/IMG_20130117_211841.jpg' /><br/><img src='http://lh4.ggpht.com/-mUFA0oHmn_8/UPkWefrtXEI/AAAAAAAAI8k/J9_Jr7wibBY/IMG_20130117_211235.jpg' /></div> garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com15Kawela Bay, Kawela Bay21.703333 -158.01tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-49661944795003412162013-01-05T23:07:00.003-08:002013-01-05T23:47:22.219-08:00The Numbers Don Lie V2.0 <div dir="ltr">Back in Sept I posted a blog called "<a href="/2012/09/the_numbers_dont_lie.html">The Numbers Don't Lie</a>". It ended up being more of a self justification as to why I hadn't done better at <a href="http://www.ultratrailmb.com/" target="_blank">UTMB</a>, and throughout 2012 in general. I seemed to find resolve in reminding myself of just how little I was able to run in the nearly full year that I was sidelined.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Through further reflection however I realized that I was also making some race day nutritional gaffes along the way. I've since addressed these via the handful of races I've run since Sept. Primarily this involved not consuming enough electrolytes during my races. Yes I've heard of Tim Noakes, yes I've read <a href="http://www.irunfar.com/2012/08/waterlogged-part-ii-trials-questions-and-suggestions-regarding-hydration-and-ultramarathons.html" target="_blank">his electrolyte theory</a>, yes he's much smarter than me, and no his theory does not work for me in particular.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">After returning from UTMB in early September I was carrying a bit of a hip/glute med injury around with me that pretty much shut down my running for the better part of three weeks. I was however able to hike, and since the fall in the Pacific Northwest is usually the best time of the year we enjoyed plenty of stunningly beautiful treks. Such as this:</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-JfXKLAQQPJU/UOkeVy3kMMI/AAAAAAAAIMU/UKlGMabcBw8/s1600/IMG_6373.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-JfXKLAQQPJU/UOkeVy3kMMI/AAAAAAAAIMU/UKlGMabcBw8/s320/IMG_6373.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">and this:</div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-L2dCObqEAzQ/UOkfmUS5-eI/AAAAAAAAIMw/scnoVhAks3Q/s1600/IMG_6273.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-L2dCObqEAzQ/UOkfmUS5-eI/AAAAAAAAIMw/scnoVhAks3Q/s320/IMG_6273.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">By October, and thanks to <a href="http://www.moveo.ca/" target="_blank">Moveo</a>, I was finally back to running again and I've been on a bit of a constant progression since then. In fact this December goes down as the single biggest running month of my entire life, and by a decent margin. Factor in that we had some of the earliest low level snow that I've ever experienced in my nine years on the coast, and a decent chunk of the running was completed on <a href="http://www.kahtoola.com/microspikes.php" target="_blank">microspikes</a> and/or snowshoes.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">As I sit here tapering for the <a href="http://www.hurt100trailrace.com/" target="_blank">HURT 100</a> miler in just two weeks time it is with an air of confidence that I simply have not possessed in three full years, since exactly this time in 2010. There are of course absolutely no guarantees with racing, especially 100 milers, but I've put in the work and I'm ready to wear my result come race day.&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">By the numbers. I ran over 1000 miles / 1635 km between October 1st and Jan 1st.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I managed to eclipse 3000 miles for the year, with a very late push.&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">After the first five months I had covered less than 1000 miles as I was strategically worked my way back from injury.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">In December (well technically from Dec 2nd till Jan 1st) I managed over 450 miles / 730kms. Included in this were two 50km races. At my first, the <a href="http://ultrasignup.com/results_event.aspx?did=17494" target="_blank">Deception Pass 50km</a> on Dec 8th, I managed my first ultra victory in nearly three years. I ran under four hours in setting the new course record, during a 92 mile week. I was very happy with that.&nbsp;</div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-nvHvzt_RjCg/UOkejElUv_I/AAAAAAAAIMc/pzv-yZOE4jU/s1600/43030559-IMG_0074.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="213" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-nvHvzt_RjCg/UOkejElUv_I/AAAAAAAAIMc/pzv-yZOE4jU/s320/43030559-IMG_0074.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Photo Credit Glenn Tachiyama</td></tr></tbody></table><div dir="ltr">To close out 2012 I knocked down 300km / 185m of running in just nine days time. From Christmas Eve until and including New Year's Day.&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I ran the NYD <a href="http://clubfatass.com/events/VancouverNewYear/results/2013" target="_blank">Fat Ass 50k</a>, a 'fun run' that always seems to draw a pretty fast crowd near the front. Again I was very happy with my run as I shaved the better part of thirteen minutes off my best time at this event with a 3h47m06s effort to snag 3rd place.&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">In 2012 I was only allowed to run 10k on NYD. In 2011 I 'ran' 10k on my crutches. In 2010, leading up to HURT Hawaii, I ran 3h59m55s after knocking down 300km in ten days. I really like where I'm at right now. I haven't felt this strong in, well...ever.</div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-9JqCAlkiLxI/UOkeyfDI5uI/AAAAAAAAIMk/6xjrn4uod4A/s1600/photo+(1).JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="273" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-9JqCAlkiLxI/UOkeyfDI5uI/AAAAAAAAIMk/6xjrn4uod4A/s320/photo+(1).JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Photo Credit Mike Palichuk</td></tr></tbody></table><div dir="ltr">The numbers don't lie and hopefully this means what I think it means come race day on Jan 19th.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">2012 as a whole</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr"><b>Running&nbsp;</b></div><div dir="ltr">x 320 individual runs, not running specific days, of which I have no real idea<br />4835 kms / 3005 miles<br />661 hours<br />168,000 meters / 551,000 feet</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr"><b>Biking&nbsp;</b></div><div dir="ltr">x 68<br />1650 kms / 1025 miles<br />78 hours<br />25,000 meters / 115,000 feet</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr"><b>Running by month</b></div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Dec - x 31 / 730 kms / 80 hours / 24,000 meters - feeling fitter than I ever have before</div><div dir="ltr">Nov - x 27 / 490k / 68h / 19,000m - feeling like finally back to peak fitness</div><div dir="ltr">Oct - x 24 / 415k / 64h / 17,000m - getting back to good again</div><div dir="ltr">Sept - x 31 / 300k / 68h / 12,000m - hip injury forced mostly hiking<br />Aug - x 23 / 461k / 76h / 21,000m - utmb<br />July - x 24 / 261k / 52h / 10,000m - sick + back to back dnf's<br />June - x 34 / 650k / 73h / 22,000m - one of my best ever mileage months<br />May - x 27 / 376k / 48h / 15,000m - allowed to start back on mountainous terrain<br />Apr - x 25 / 363k / 36h / 10,000m - still following strict mileage limits<br />Mar - x 30 / 361k / 45h / 9000m - building consistency<br />Feb - x 23 / 265k / 33h / 6000m - slow controlled build<br />Jan - x 21 / 163k / 18h / 3000m - fresh off of injuries</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">GR</div> garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-22834395528997879452012-12-29T14:29:00.000-08:002012-12-29T14:29:56.036-08:00BCMC Descent FKT - 15m52s It's rare that I have a run where I celebrate it like I've just won The Stanley Cup. Today was one of those very special days.<br /><br /><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="300" scrolling="no" src="http://app.strava.com/runs/34614085/embed/f60d1b43b9a96005796a91da40e9ed9571b12ac5" width="500"></iframe> <br /><br />With perfect conditions on the local BCMC trail, which is listed as a 3.3km / 2 mile trail that loses 853 meters / 2800 feet over an average grade of 25-35%, I leaned into it and held on (stayed upright) all the way to the bottom in less than sixteen minutes.<br /><br />Just last week I ran a 19m29s descent in which the conditions were a bit more complex, and I commented afterwards that I thought I could break nineteen minutes. That was my goal today. That was all I expected to see when I clicked the lap counter once I'd reached the gate at the bottom. Seeing a time of 15m52s sent me into a flurry of leaping around like an idiot.<br /><br />Now this run will certainly have to be noted as a snow assisted descent, though you still have to cover the terrain underfoot. By perfect conditions I mean that there is a decent snow pack over the top portions of the route so you can really stride out over what is normally very technical terrain. The mid portion however is a bit of a slushy slip and slide and my downhill ski experience certainly contributed to keeping me upright as I slid as much as I ran through this section.<br /><br />The bottom was a mix of snow, ice and then the normal rocks and roots. I managed to rip my microspikes off my feet in about six seconds flat and refused to pause my watch for any reason as I didn't want to compromise the GPS file.<br /><br />I pretty much turned myself inside out on this run. I made but two missteps in the snow which cost me a few seconds and had just two hikers who refused to relinquish the trail and forced me into the knee deep snow on the sides of the trail. All in all people were incredibly&nbsp;accommodating,&nbsp;and I attempted to give them as much heads up as possible with friendly "hellos" as I approached. The run really couldn't have gone any better. My only regret is that I wasn't wearing my GoPro for the whole thing:)<br /><br />What really makes this an extra special run is that I've been training my tail off in preparation for my first 100 miler in two and a half years, that being the HURT Hawaii on Jan 19th. With 115 miles / 190km in the last six days I don't get much more tired than I've been as of late, but thankfully the body has stayed strong and my mind is simply being strung along for the ride right now.<br /><iframe frameborder="0" height="300" src="http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/255505467" width="500"></iframe> <br />Enough blogging, it's time to convince my mind that it wants to go for yet another run already.<br />GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com3tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-49627169964799755972012-12-12T14:58:00.000-08:002012-12-12T14:59:40.441-08:00The Bee's Knees <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-W_famVS_ATs/UMkGfqTlcnI/AAAAAAAAIL8/ItT6x5ivcME/s1600/307872_10150334150622739_14153839_n.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-W_famVS_ATs/UMkGfqTlcnI/AAAAAAAAIL8/ItT6x5ivcME/s320/307872_10150334150622739_14153839_n.jpg" width="220" /></a></div>It's been over a year and a half since I met Leon Lutz at a running conference in Utah. I was impressed by his dedication to his beard, he was impressed by my dedication to my running. We hit it off and shared a few drinks over the course of the weekend.<br /><br />Leon asked if I'd mind doing an interview regarding my injury and recovery process following my initial broken foot, and I happily obliged. Neither of us could have ever guessed it would take the better part of 18 months to finally piece this together, but then again neither of us could have dreamt that I was in fact nowhere near the end of my recovery process when we first met. Au contraire, I wasn't even at the midway point since the second broken foot had yet to actually occur.<br /><br />I have to admit that I get a touch emotional as I read Leon's take on my story. I believe he's done a great job in really summarizing what the last few years have truly been like for me. It's not been easy. It's not been without its constant self doubt and frustration. I think the reason Leon nailed this one, outside of his writing skillset, is in essence because he kind of lived it along with me. Leon became personally invested in my running successes and failures after we'd befriended each other and agreed to conduct an interview on the premise that I was already fully recovered from a jones fracture (I still can't even type that word without a tinge of anxiety hitting me).<br /><br />As we leaned toward making that initial interview a reality everything went sideways again. I never would have believed that a full recovery could take nearly as long as it did, and Leon didn't even broach the subject again until he knew that I felt it was finally behind me. Eighteen months along and I find it was actually worth the wait, because although one's story is ever evolving, we hope and believe that this lengthy chapter has finally been put to rest.<br /><br />Leon's blog is titled "This Bee's Knees" and <a href="http://thisbeesknees.blogspot.ca/2012/12/on-moving-of-mountains-interview-with.html" target="_blank">here's the link to his interview</a>. I hope you enjoy it.<br /><br />GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com11tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-75724749640359667152012-11-04T16:55:00.002-08:002012-11-04T17:17:04.445-08:00How To Go From 3rd To 19th In A Few Quick Steps - Mountain Masochist Race Report <div dir="ltr">This was my third time lining up for the <a href="http://www.eco-xsports.com/events/mmtr/" target="_blank">Mountain Masochist Trail Run</a> 50 miler with my last run being in a time of seven hours flat for 3rd overall in 2009.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">The last time I lined for for a 50 mile race at all was 18 months ago during my short recluse from crutches. I was really excited for this one for after being sidelined for so long it was one of the few races I could use to really gauge where my fitness was. In the end hurricane Sandy removed any chance of fast times though as the upper portions of the course were blanketed in a decent amount of snow. I figured this could only play to my favor though, being Canadian and since we live in igloos up here.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">This was the 30th rendition of the Mountain Masochist&nbsp;and it also involved a few course changes. The first six or seven miles used to be on the relatively flat paved Blue Ridge Parkway, now there was but a few miles of paved surface and a bit more climbing on trails. </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I found myself inadvertently leading the race through the first trail section and then settled into a group of seven runners who included <a href="http://ultrasignup.com/results_participant.aspx?fname=Eric&amp;lname=Grossman" target="_blank">Eric Grossman</a>, <a href="http://ultrasignup.com/results_participant.aspx?fname=Brian&amp;lname=Rusiecki" target="_blank">Brian Rusiecki</a>, <a href="http://ultrasignup.com/results_participant.aspx?fname=Chris&amp;lname=Reed" target="_blank">Chris Reed</a>, <a href="http://ultrasignup.com/results_participant.aspx?fname=Frank&amp;lname=Gonzalez" target="_blank">Frank Gonzalez</a>, <a href="http://ultrasignup.com/results_participant.aspx?fname=Brian&amp;lname=Schmidt" target="_blank">Brian Schmidt</a>, <a href="http://ultrasignup.com/results_participant.aspx?fname=Ty&amp;lname=Draney" target="_blank">Ty Draney</a> and <a href="http://ultrasignup.com/results_participant.aspx?fname=David&amp;lname=Hryvniak" target="_blank">David Hryuniak</a> (a 2h32m marathoner attempting his first 50)</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I was happy to follow the leaders but given the first hour was by headlamp and my Princeton Tec Apex was casting shadows over other runners legs as the brightest light, I got pushed back to the front. Eric Grossman joked,</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"Is that some kind of crazy Canadian light you're wearing there?" </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I think someone else piped in with, </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"Yeah what is that a metric light?"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">We clicked off the miles with occasional banter. Having run the race twice before I was surprised that our lead group was so large. </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">As we hit the first climb people laid into it. I'm a decent climber but my bread and butter is my descending so I slowly slipped back in the pack. I quickly found myself in 6th, from 1st and it always amazes me at how much this can affect your perception of how you're running. I immediately attempted to stifle my inner voice which was freaking out</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"DROPPED! What are we five miles into this thing? You're dnf'ing for sure today"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I just kept reminding myself that the placings weren't accurate until after the equivalent descents. Sure enough as we crested and I let my legs roll out I found myself back in the lead within a mile. </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">A longer climb ensued and I found myself in 7th</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"D-N-F. You're not a runner anymore. It's been too long and you haven't had a good race since getting back at this. You can't keep pushing like this and make it to the finish line today." </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"We'll see what happens on the next descent!" Says positive me to negative me.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">We topped out at an aid station where half the group stopped to grab fluids. My one handheld still had enough to get me to the next aid so I rounded the corner behind two others. It was singletrack and a bit rough and once I hopped back into the lead I was actually able to open up a decent gap. I figured it best to capitalize on this since I knew I'd be yo-yo'ing with guys in this fashion throughout the day.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Confirming my fondest memories of Masochist the sun rose, right on cue, as we were on a gravel road that allowed for relatively open views. Though a brisk wind pervaded and some cloud cover lingered, it was a beautiful morning.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"What are ya gonna do now that the suns up headlamp boy!?" Grossman jokes.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">The pack had closed the gap and went about putting some distance into me on the long strung out gravel road climb. </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">The following descent was steeper and rockier and I managed to get myself up into second, just behind Eric. An obvious pattern was unfolding and it wasn't until about fifteen miles in that our pack started to thin. I was shocked to see that Brian Rusiecki was no longer with us as I considered him the pre-race favorite given the year he's having.&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">We eventually settled into groups with Eric leading and Hryuniak off his wing, third and forth paired off together as did sixth and seventh. I was in no mans land without a dance partner. No one spoke fluent Canadian though so I wasn't completely surprised.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">At about twenty four miles in Rusiecki comes storming up out of nowhere,</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"Man they were hot outta the gates weren't they"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"Yeah I was surprised by how many people stuck with the lead group"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">and with that he was gone. I knew then and there that he was going to win. It wasn't even a question in my mind. It was almost the same spot where Geoff Roes pulled away from me in 09 to smash the CR. Geoff had apparently just warmed up that year while I was running to my capacity. </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">My good buddy Hays Poole and his wife Kathy and son Will who reside a few hours away in Raleigh NC had driven up to crew for me. It was Hays's third time doing as much yet the first time his wife and son could join. The long story short is that we met through NHL hockey as his Carolina Hurricanes defeated my Edmonton Oilers in seven games to win Stanley's Mug. This is relevant information because we're die hard fans. I came into the twenty six mile 'half way point' and while looking for Hays, Kathy and Will in the crowd I spotted an Edmonton Oilers shirt screaming at me like a beacon. Quality move, for not only did it allow for a flawless transition but it gave me something to laugh about for the next hour.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Right after the half way point you get into the largest climbs of the day. In my previous runs I had predominantly power hiked these areas I wanted to alter that to predominantly running them this year. My goal in 2009 was sub seven hour race and i missed by twenty nine seconds. I locked into a rhythm and started doing what I had not in these past races. This combined with the fact that I felt really good while doing so was showing me that I was outperforming my previous best run on the course. This is what I came for. This was the test I wanted and even though we all knew the course would run slower with the snow I was at least confirming to myself that my training has been paying off and I'm close to, if not finally back to where I was before my injuries derailed me.&nbsp; </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I picked up fifth within a few miles and then snagged fourth as we headed into 'The Loop' at mile thirty three. The Loop for me has been one of my favorite sections of the race. It's five miles long, all on singletrack and with a decent level of technicality to it. It's the closest section of MMTR that feels familiar to my home terrain.&nbsp;As I grabbed fourth heading into The Loop Horty tells me that third is only three minutes ahead and the leaders are fifteen minutes up. Immediately we get into the snow and Clarke's pre-race proclamation of</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"It's like two different courses out there" in regards to the front half vs the back half is showing itself to be as literal as he intended it to be.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I went to work with the knowledge that from there to the finish is predominantly downhill. I liked where I was and had told myself throughout the day that I simply had to be within striking distance by this point in the race. The first half works a bit against my strengths while the back half aligns with them perfectly.&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I powered through the snow anticipating doing The Loop as in previous years. I follow the flagging through the snow and eventually see Brian and Eric running together and towards me,</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"Waaa. What's goin on?!"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"Out and back"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Oh right I think to myself, I remember reading about the out and back section this year. I mark the spot where I crossed paths with the leaders and take a time check. A few seconds later I spot Frank a switchback ahead of me and as I close the gap we reach the top nearly in unison. There's an orienteering punch that you clip your bib with to show you've gone up. I was distracted by the views for a second and actually said to myself </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"No you're racing, you can't hang out here and fully appreciate this"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"But, but, but...I hate racing, you suck" Again these are the internal conversations I have with myself when I run.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Hats off to Clarke though, the view from that perch was beyond anything the original course ever presented. It was the highlight of the entire race course for me.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">The snow obviously became deeper as we climbed and near this high point it was shin deep in sections. Given that only the four of us runners had been through we were in essence breaking trail (Clarke and crew had been through so it wasn't 100% breaking trail) </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I laid into the descent and having plenty of experience in the snow Frank graciously stepped aside and cheered me on. I time checked where I'd seen the leaders and was pleased to know that I had gained two minutes on them. I had flirting visions of maybe closing in on one of them by the final three to four mile long descent that takes you into the final mile of the race. </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I flew through the snow and was buoyed mentally by the fact that I knew I'd at least crack top three unless something completely&nbsp;unforeseen&nbsp;arose.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"You're going the wrong way!"</div><div dir="ltr">"No I'm not, it's and out and back!"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"You're going the wrong way!"</div><div dir="ltr">"No I'm not, it's and out and back!"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"You're going the wrong way!"</div><div dir="ltr">"No I'm not, it's and out and back!"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">x10</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Couple that with my own recognition of where I was by thinking</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"Its weird we're not doing the full loop this year. I wonder if there was just too much snow on that side?"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"You're going the wrong way!"</div><div dir="ltr">"No I'm not, it's and out and back!"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I had this exchange so many times that shortly before arriving back at the aid station (which is in fact the same aid station you hit after the loop) I wanted to say to Horty and Clarke,</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">'Can you please tell people it's an out and back this year. No one seems to understand this' (yes I'm a complete moron)</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Instead I just look for my crew as I'm in full on race mode and feeding off of the slim hopes of catching 2nd.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"Hays! Hays! Hays?"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Clarke and Horty look like they're staring at a ghost as the approach me,</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"What are you doing?'</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"I'm looking for my crew. Hays!" </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"No what are you doing here?"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"What?"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"You're supposed to come in from over there" As Horty points to the exit from the loop about a hundred feet away.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"No it's an out and back" I say, still not clicking into anything around me. Then it hits me. Then my eyes open as my racing goggles are ripped from my face, as the horse blinders are lifted I see twenty volunteers all stating at me with remorse. That look of "oh no" "I feel terrible for him right now" is just&nbsp;emanating&nbsp;off of everyone.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">My brain snaps back into reality and I'm overwhelmed by the flood of emotions coursing through me. In my head,</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"Are you f#@king kidding me! I did what!!? Don't speak Gary. Count to something. I don't want to f#@king count. Walk. Walk away and compose yourself dammit."</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Out loud to Clarke,</div><div dir="ltr">"I'm just. I'm just gonna go over this way for a bit."</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I walked around the corner and sat down in a pile of snow in front of a truck that put me out of sight. I slumped my head into my hands and started processing what had just occurred. Clarke found me a few minutes later.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"I'm sorry man. How ya doin?"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Both of us knowing it wasn't his fault of course.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"I'm alright"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"What are ya thinkin?"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">The serious thought of being a poopy pants and not closing it out never crossed my mind. I just needed a few minutes to basically tell myself that a result on the day, whether 3rd or 30th, wasn't going to change how I ran, how I felt, how happy I was with what I had done up until that point. Yeah it sucked that I was no longer in the race, but there were exactly zero reasons not to finish. Couple that with the fact that I was staying with JB Basham who'd done a 112 mile version of the Hardrock hundred miler back in July and I really didn't even have a choice in the matter.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Five minutes further along and I started cooling off in the breeze and realized if I didn't get moving that I might end up with an actual reason not to continue. I said thanks to all the aid station crew and walked back out on course. Having absolutely nothing left to fight for I ambled my way along letting my body temperature determine when I'd actually start running again. I sauntered for a mile before the wind on my body coupled with the snow at my feet had cooled me to the point of needing to generate my own body heat.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">A few miles in and I stopped at the intersection where I'd gone wrong. I distinctly remembered my thought process as I ran through the first time, which only strengthen my resolve in my ignorance.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">There was a ton of flagging there and while running out it really stood out as being heavily marked. My eyes instinctively followed the majority the flagging towards the right and I never even noticed the additional flagging to the left that would guide us back around the loop. My thought while running through the first time,</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"There's a ton of flagging here, they must really want to ensure we don't go left by mistake"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">After I digested all this I proceeded to close out the final twelve miles of the course. I alternated between running walking and chatting along the way. Given that I've never been able to chat up the aid station workers while racing MMTR in the past two runs I spent a few minutes at each of the remaining four stations joking around with everyone. When I spotted watermelon at an aid station it necessitated a lengthier stop to help lighten their eventual pack down load later in the day. A runner I had passed came into the station while I was owning the watermelon and I looked at him with a piece hanging out of my mouth and deadpanned&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"Don't f@#king touch the watermelon"</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Thankfully he got my sense of humor.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I ended up finishing with what my Garmin showed as fifty six miles in 8h55m for 19th place. Top Twenty!&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Brian won in 7h30 which many believe would equate to a low 6h50'ish time without snow and Eric was second in 7h45m. Local rockstar Frank Gonzales snagged third in a time 8h07m.&nbsp;Outside of my folly I had a fantastic weekend in Virginia.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Thanks as always to Clarke and his amazing team of volunteers. David Horton, for nothing more than his comment to me post race,</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">"That was impressive what ya did out there today. STUPID, but impressive that you stuck with it."</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Hays, Kathy, Will, best crew ever!</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Hilary and Jonathan Basham for adopting a Canadian stray for the weekend and then allowing their friends to endlessly mock me for the rest of the evening over our post race drinks.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Gear</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.montrail.com/Men's-Mountain-Masochist%E2%84%A2/GM2077,default,pd.html" target="_blank">Montrail Mountain Masochists</a> (yes named after the race)<br /><a href="http://www.mountainhardwear.com/Men%27s-Ghost-Whisperer%E2%84%A2-Anorak/OM4625,default,pd.html" target="_blank">Mountain Hardwear Hooded Ghost Whisperer Anorak Jacket</a><br /><a href="http://www.mountainhardwear.com/Men%27s-Ultrarefuel%E2%84%A2-Short/OM4622,default,pd.html" target="_blank">Mountain Hardwear Ultrarefuel Shorts</a><br /><a href="http://www.drymaxsocks.com/trail_running_maximum.php" target="_blank">Drymax Socks - Maximum Protection Trail Running v4</a> (no blisters, as always)<br />P<a href="http://www.princetontec.com/?q=apex-rechargeable" target="_blank">rinceton Tec Apex Rechargeable</a><br /><a href="http://www.hammernutrition.com/products/hammer-gel.hg.html?gclid=CLi0rt_CtrMCFUdxQgodwysAOQ" target="_blank">Hammer Gel</a><br /><a href="http://www.hammernutrition.com/products/endurolytes.elt.html?navcat=fuels-energy-drinks" target="_blank">Hammer Endurolytes</a></div><div dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.hammernutrition.com/products/seat-saver.ssv.html" target="_blank">Hammer Seat Saver</a> (best running lube I've found)</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I'll be back...(I'd return again no matter what the outcome)</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">GR</div> garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com12tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-72990154388580148582012-10-27T18:52:00.002-07:002012-10-27T18:52:55.725-07:00Carkeek 12hr - The Custom 5hr Version <div dir="ltr">I ran the <a href="http://carkeek12hour.com/" target="_blank">Carkeek 12hr</a> today in Carkeek Park, Seattle. Race Directors Brock Gavery and Sam Thompson have been organizing the fun run for six years now and all proceeds go to charity. Couple that with it being a Halloween run where plenty of people show up in costume and it's one fun day out on the trails.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">It's a looping course and at just 1.93 miles it might not sound like much but <a href="http://carkeek12hour.com/" target="_blank">checkout their website</a> and know that their claim to it being one of or indeed the hardest 12hr out there is legit.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Each loop has 430 feet of climbing and descent, and on this day in particular weather was a slight factor as it was rainy, windy and freezing to start in the dark and though the rains eventually subsided the trail became slightly more slick with each passing loop.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I never thought I'd draw this comparison but it really does run like a mini HURT course, though it certainly lacks the level of technicality that HURT has become famous for. The similarity starts with the fact that it's a looping course and continues with the fact that there are pretty much three climbs over the 1.93 miles, and of course the first is the longest, exactly like HURT. In fact if you were to complete a hundred miles on the Carkeek course you'd end up with 22,278 feet of climbing and descent, which is pretty damn close to the 25,000 that HURT presents.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">The 12hr starts at 6am. We were late getting outta Tacoma and ended up arriving at 6:03am, which of course meant everyone but the RD's were gone, and even they were still setting up camp. </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Given that we were in our Halloween costumes and not 100% ready to run anyways we were quickly sucked into the fire to help sustain our falling body temperatures. After a good thirty minutes and watching the lead crew come through I realized that if I didn't get my ass in gear that the nasty weather was gonna win out and I'd be ridden with guilt at cowering to our standard fall precipitation.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">At 6:45am I headed out with the intention of simply trying to warm up sufficiently enough so that I could kill another mug of coffee by the campfire pit after one loop before actually getting on with my run shortly thereafter. Of course once actually running everything starts to make sense again, the body heats, the rain seems like a compliment rather than a hindrance to your day and the mind settles into a relaxed state that makes you wonder how you ever could have considered not running because of a few measly rain drops.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">With one lap down I knew stopping would be a terrible idea and I found my groove and started to roll. Roxy was along with me and of course in costume herself. It wasn't going so well for either of us and after numerous stops to address her outfit I ended up stripping it off and carrying it along (she ran the rest completely naked).</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">After lap two I changed out myself and will point out for sake of accuracy later in the post that I in fact paused my watch for the few minutes it took me to switch outfits. Carkeek doesn't keep times, just laps, and I had a time goal in mind as a test of where I'm truly at right now.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">After lap three I passed off Roxy to Linda as she was also running and typically Roxy prefers Linda's pace on long runs.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Lap four and I was on it, I felt good. I was on top of my calories, my electrolytes, and my fluids. I decided I would in fact shoot for my pre-race goal of the equivalent of a sub five hour 50km run. Due to the looping nature though it broke down to attempting to run 17 laps or 32.81 miles or 52.8km as a 16 loop run would only equal 49.7km. Blah blah blah</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Over the next 13 loops I was really happy with my consistency. There were obvious highs and lows but a few other things I really wanted to test out on the day were my mental game, and my ability to really fight for something I had set out to achieve on the day. This race toughness has been lacking for me lately. I've fought hard to reach numerous finish lines this year but most of those were made more complex by my mind being months ahead of my fitness levels. I never set out to just finish the <a href="http://www.csp115.com/" target="_blank">CSP115</a> in March, but that's what it ended up being. I never set out to finish 53rd at <a href="http://www.ultratrailmb.com/" target="_blank">UTMB</a> in early Sept, but that's all I had in me. Obviously Carkeek is a fairly low key event and for me I desired nothing more, for if I blew up at least I'd know where I was at right now. Heading into <a href="http://www.eco-xsports.com/events/mmtr/" target="_blank">Mountain Masochist 50 miler</a> in Virginia next weekend and then finally returning to <a href="http://www.hurt100trailrace.com/" target="_blank">HURT Hawaii</a> again in Jan, I was really setting out to hopefully confirm what I'd been sensing as of late. This is the best I've felt since pre-crutches, since August 2010.</div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-5RpcZs97jdA/UIyPlvOxJ-I/AAAAAAAAFW4/3MFlZZjMOlw/s1600/photo.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-5RpcZs97jdA/UIyPlvOxJ-I/AAAAAAAAFW4/3MFlZZjMOlw/s320/photo.JPG" width="239" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">(Managed one slip during the race. Never suffered from road rash in a trail race before)</td></tr></tbody></table><div dir="ltr">The highs were so beautiful. I was forced into a reminiscing phase that lasted hours. The repetitiveness of the terrain and the certainty that an aid station was always less than a few miles away allowed the mind to wander while the body did it's job.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">One year ago at Carkeek I very tentatively walked two loops, a mere 6km, and it was a victorious day. I'd been out of a walking boot but a few weeks and off of crutches just over five weeks. The doctor advised that it was potentially doable but to stop at the sign of any pain. Every step was a struggle and yet I refused to stop because the only thing that scared me more than potentially breaking my foot a third time was having the inability to walk six bloody kilometers. </div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">It was January before I was allowed to run ten kilometers. I have spent far too much time this year staring off into the distance at where I want to be with my running and racing, longing to simply match where I was in 2010. I've forced my body to do things it wasn't conditioned for and then been frustrated by my lack of ability to achieve my racing goals. I've never been completely fair with myself throughout this process and I've never properly celebrated what really boils down to some of my best race results when the entire journey is put into perspective. I had completely lost perspective on this, and thankfully today it hit me full force...of course the fact that today was the first time in this lengthy journey that I felt like I had glimpses of my previous running levels certainly helped the positive mindset and awareness along.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">2012 has been one of the best years of my life and it's been capped off by asking the love of my life to marry me while we were in France AND she actually said yes!</div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ohcCPyMuDnA/UIyMlvonHYI/AAAAAAAAFWg/mRt-g9BeGXk/s1600/IMG_6122.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ohcCPyMuDnA/UIyMlvonHYI/AAAAAAAAFWg/mRt-g9BeGXk/s320/IMG_6122.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div dir="ltr">I have nothing to complain about and I know this. Today was still an extra special day though as although I just missed out on my sub five hour 17 loop goal, running 5h01m24s, I was well over 50km by five hours as I closed out the 52.8k version of my own personal race today.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Splits<br />18.49<br />18.41<br />18.03<br />18.30<br />16.42<br />16.40<br />17.16<br />17.23<br />17.12<br />17.30<br />17.02<br />17.23<br />17.13<br />18.59 (Roxy left Linda and caught up to me. I had to hold her up:-) )<br />18.08<br />17.57<br />17.58</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Gear</div><div dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.montrail.com/Men%27s-Mountain-Masochist%E2%84%A2-II/GM2141,default,pd.html" target="_blank">Montrail Mountain Masochists</a><br /><a href="http://www.mountainhardwear.com/Men%27s-Effusion%E2%84%A2-Hooded-Jacket/OM5054,default,pd.html" target="_blank">Mountain Hardwear Effusion Hooded Jacket</a><br /><a href="http://www.mountainhardwear.com/Men%27s-Epic-Glove/OM4984,default,pd.html" target="_blank">Mountain Hardwear Epic Gloves</a><br /><a href="http://www.mountainhardwear.com/Men%27s-Refueler%E2%84%A2-Short/OM4623,default,pd.html" target="_blank">Mountain Hardwear Refueler Shorts</a><br /><a href="http://princetontec.com/?q=apex-rechargeable" target="_blank">Princeton Tec Apex Rechargeable</a><br /><a href="http://www.drymaxsocks.com/trail_running_maximum.php" target="_blank">Drymax Max Protection Trail Running v4</a><br /><a href="http://www.hammernutrition.ca/fuels/hammer-gel/" target="_blank">Hammer Gel</a></div><div dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.hammernutrition.ca/fuels/endurolytes/" target="_blank">Hammer Endurolytes</a></div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr"><u>GR</u><br /></div> garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-14134245477352932492012-09-11T11:38:00.002-07:002013-01-04T20:35:53.696-08:00The Numbers Don't Lie <div dir="ltr"><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-fD8yTwekWuw/UE-CKPacRjI/AAAAAAAAFVw/WMfkrgzTX8g/s1600/UTMB+Race+3.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="208" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-fD8yTwekWuw/UE-CKPacRjI/AAAAAAAAFVw/WMfkrgzTX8g/s320/UTMB+Race+3.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">(Everyone in this picture ran significantly more mileage than me in the previous two years)</td></tr></tbody></table>This isn't my UTMB race report as much as a general overview of the numbers I've come across in the last few days while playing with my Garmin files.<br /><br />The numbers don't lie because the numbers are training mileage. The numbers are how hard you've worked to get to where you are. The numbers are often predictive of race day results, successes or failures.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I didn't like the numbers of my last few years, and additionally last few months of training while heading into UTMB, so I did the only rational thing I could think of and I completely ignored them.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">In fact I inadvertently stumbled across the numbers below while searching for six week stats around my departure for France. I had never looked at or appreciated just how consistent my training was in 2009 which lead to my highly successful 2010 season of running. Since then it's just been a mess due to injury. In the one and a half year span from Sept 2010 through Jan of this year, I ran a total of just over 1000km.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I had ONE really good month of training this year. In June I ran 650km, which for me was the highest mileage I'd ever attained, but the climbing was only average at 25,000 meters. In July I caught a shitty head cold that lingered for four full weeks. In August I directed my first ever 50 mile trail race, <a href="http://www.squamish50.com/" target="_blank">The Squamish 50</a>.&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">I had envisioned the final six weeks before departing for France on August 15th to be littered with laps of my local 3,000ft climb up and down Grouse Mountain. In the end I couldn't bare to even look at how little I'd been able to run. It has only been since returning to Canada that I've actually brought myself to do this. I honestly feared that a reality check into how little I'd accomplished in the pivotal final six week training stretch might have completely flattened any false sense of confidence I'd possessed while heading to France. Even I was startled to see that in those six full weeks I'd run less than 375km with less than 20,000m of climbing, in what should have been the toughest 42 day stretch I'd faced in years.</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">So what am I even getting at here? Post UTMB I said this via FB:&nbsp;</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr"></div><div class="MsoNormal"><i>Of all the ways I could chose to dissect my race I care for only one, it was a resounding success.<o:p></o:p></i></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><i>UTMB, even in its shortened version, was still nearly 110km long with over 18,000ft of climbing and descent. Mix that with a run almost entirely by headlamp (7pm start) where we had rain, slush, snow, and leg thrashing descents, and all in all it was really a beast of a course. I battled as hard as I could and truly left it all out there. That was all I had to give, every ounce, and I'm incredibly proud to know that I could not have demanded more from my body on race day.<o:p></o:p></i></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><i>Just one year ago I longed for this race while hobbling around on what felt like an eternal broken foot, and today, less than a year removed from those sticks, I simply could not be happier to call myself an official finisher the Ultra Trail Du Mont-Blanc!!</i></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal">I believed <i>almost</i> everything I was saying. I still somehow expected more out of my body, even though I gave every drop I could towards my race. It's only in referencing the below training numbers that I have finally come to terms with my UTMB. I couldn't have asked for more, in fact I think I managed to out stretch my training numbers and come up with a race day performance that rivals some of my best runs. Most importantly though, I DID NOT GET INJURED, I had a blast, and I'm fully ready to hopefully set into a solid twelve months of running and training...UTMB 2013 of course, is less than 11.5 months away...</div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><iframe class="twitvid-player" frameborder="0" height="360" src="http://telly.com/embed.php?guid=UPCFU&amp;autoplay=0" title="Telly video player " type="text/html" width="480"></iframe></div><br /><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr"><b>2009&nbsp;</b></div><div dir="ltr">3,915km (would be over 4,000km with Jan stats)</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Jan - Didn't Own Garmin Yet<br />Feb - 380km - 35,000m<br />Mar - 310k - 25,000m<br />Apr - 430k - 36,000m<br />May - 455k - 46,000m<br />June - 200k - 16,000 / (Western States blow up, walk to 49th place finish)<br />July - 270k - 30,000<br />Aug - 365k - 30,000<br />Sept - 375k - 27,000m<br />Oct - 300k - 21,000m<br />Nov - 260k - 20,000m<br />Dec - 570k - 35,000m</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr"><b>2010</b></div><div dir="ltr">2,590km</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Jan - 310k - 15,000m / (1st CR HURT Hawaii)<br />Feb - 320k - 8,500m<br />Mar - 320k - 8,500m<br />Apr - 450k - 13,000m<br />May - 135k - 9,400m / (time off after over training symptoms)<br />June - 355k - 13,000m / (6th Western States)<br />July - 200k - 8,500m / (more rest from over training symptoms)<br />Aug - 375k - 10,000m / (FKT on 215km ECT and 80km WCT)<br /><br />Sept - 20k - 300m / (decided on a month off)<br />Oct - 105k - 4,500m / (had been back at it less than a week when I broke my foot)<br />Nov - 0<br />Dec - 0</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr"><b>2011</b></div><div dir="ltr">858km</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Jan - 0<br />Feb -0<br />Mar - 165k - 3,200m<br />Apr - 430k - 12,600m<br />May - 220k - 8,500m / (15 days, another broken foot)<br />June - 0<br />July - 0<br />Aug - 0<br />Sept - 0<br />Oct - 0<br />Nov - 10k - 35m<br />Dec - 33k -783m</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr"><b>2012</b></div><div dir="ltr">2,900km</div><div dir="ltr"><br /></div><div dir="ltr">Jan - 163k - 3,000m<br /><br />Feb - 265k - 6,000m<br />Mar - 361k - 9,000m<br />Apr - 363k - 10,000m<br />May - 376k - 15,000m<br />June - 650k - 22,000m<br />July - 261k - 10,000m<br />Aug - 461k - 21,000m / (53rd at altered version of UTMB)<br /><br />GR</div> garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com9tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-37644539583700928442012-07-29T12:16:00.002-07:002012-07-30T14:40:44.202-07:00Speedgoat 50k Puke-A-Thon Given that my Speedgoat 50k race ended in my second straight dnf and a subsequent iv being drained into me it would be easy to simply say this was a disappointing experience. In all honesty though I knew my personal finicky relationship with altitude and placed no expectations on my race. I was hoping to experience a beautiful race in a new location and to finish as high as my body would allow, while getting some complimentary training for UTMB.<br /><br />Karl Meltzer had managed to round up some of the best trail runners in the world for this one and it was the most competitive race I'd attended since WS 2010.<br /><br />Within two minutes of starting the event it was clear to see that the true world class mountain runners such as Ricky Gates, Killian Jornet, and Max King weren't the least bit affected by the altitude as they blazed up and over our first visit to 11,000ft like it was a flat road race.<br /><br />I have no illusions of being in the same class as these guys and was almost in awe of their skill set. By the time I crawled over 11,000ft some 25+ mins back of the leaders I simply wanted to finish in a decently respectable time. Thankfully on the ensuing descent I was able to catch and pass a decent number of runners who passed me like I was standing still just minutes earlier.<br /><br />At the half way turn around Roch Horton, as always, was captaining the aid stn and handing out delicious frozen popsicle treats, thanks to some dry ice freezing techniques.<br /><br />The climb back outta here to our second visit to 11,000ft was harsh and although I consider myself to have a strong power hiking skill set it was continually rendered useless by my lack of oxygen uptake. I was truly out for a walk in the mountains.<br /><br />Again once cresting I passed a half a dozen runners on the descent, which realistically only put me close to top thirty in the race. I didn't care what my placement was for I was truly out of my element and just trying to enjoy the challenge.<br /><br />As I hit the aid stn at about km 35 everything changed instantly. I actually found myself staring at 'the chair' and then internally scolding myself for even completing such thoughts. I downed a bunch of watermelon and coke and headed out into a 2000ft climb that would bring us to 11,000ft for our third and final time.<br />From there it was but an eight km downhill into the finish.<br /><br />A two hundred meter flat run brought us to the start of the climb and the second the grade changed I knew I was in trouble. It was like driving with the handbreak struck on, every single step took 100% of my energy to complete. I felt like I was moving backwards and the ease with which people were passing me only confirmed this. Through all the struggles with the altitude I hadn't processed until that moment how damn hot it had become. I continued in slow motion until the first shade presented itself under a tree which I sat under to attempt to compose myself. Five minutes became ten, ten became fifteen, and finally nearing twenty minutes I hauled my ass up and promptly lost my guts.&nbsp;<span style="background-color: white;">&nbsp;</span><br /><br />I've never puked in a race before, ever, even in seven day expedition races I've never had an issue with my stomach before. The only comparable experience I could draw from was when I went quickly up to 12,500ft in Guatemala in 03. I suffered from altitude sickness and continual puking until I regressed to 7,000ft the following day. I was hoping 11,000 wouldn't hit me so hard, but it was feeling all too familiar.<br /><br />Puke and rally. It's a mantra in ultra running for many. A Canadian friend has puked in almost every ultra he's run and is closing in on his own version of an all 50 states achievement. I kept telling myself this as I struggled to the next shaded tree and lay down again. Ten minutes later I lost my guts again and proceeded up and to the next shaded spot.<br /><br />Sean Blanton &amp; Ashley Arnold came across me at this point and given Ashley was working the aid stn I'd left nearly an hour previous, just a mile away, she knew I wasn't doing so well. She was a champ trying to rally and motivate me and hung out with me for an addition thirty minutes as I struggled to the next shaded recluse. Eventually I set her free of her babysitting duties and stared at the runners, all hiking, on the ridgeline far above. Ten further minutes of this before I internally said to myself "It's over Gary. End this debacle and retreat to the aid station. The sooner you get down from here the better"<br /><br />As I eventually made my way towards the aid stn from the wrong direction the course marshal asked me if I was alright. In a rather comedic moment as I opened my mouth to simply say I was dropping I instead, completely unexpectedly, projectile vomitted in his direction. As he attempted to ask a second time I cut him off again. For good measure as he made a third stab at asking me a question I lost my stomach one last time, to which he simply responded with "let's get you a cot."<br /><br />They eventually transported me back to the race start at 8,000ft via a ski lift and gondola combo. After about 45mins of failed attempts at rehydrating, anything that went in only lasted a few minutes, they threw an iv into me. Another slightly comical moment as they asked if I'd like some anti-nausea medication. After confirming there were no side effects I obviously said yes. The iv drained and I felt 100% better,<br /><br />"I think I'm okay without that nausea medication. I feel way better"<br /><br />"That's because we put the medication in the iv bag five minutes ago"<br /><br />"Oh, right"<br /><br />As a further side note I was informed that a half tablet of Viagra can in fact help with elevation issues... please just ensure you aren't wearing spandex if you utilize that tip however... no pun intended.<br /><br />Speedgoat. You killed me. Thanks for the humbling experience and especially for the chance to really witness the best in the sport show us all how it's done. Congrats to Montrail teammate Max King on snagging 3rd, and Sean Meissner on running solid for 24th.<br /><br />A quick peruse of the results tells a story of altitude living to running at altitude success. I guess Max has been sleeping in an altitude tent at 12,000ft for two years. They look pretty simple to make so I'm just gonna sleep in a giant plastic bag from here on out and hope for the best.<br />Onward and upward, but hopefully just shy of 11g for the next little bit.<br /><br />GR<br /><br /><div class="separator"style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-kLa1r9z_wJw/UBb_VE_L5TI/AAAAAAAAFVA/6BDYpTtM1vk/s640/blogger-image-1825038907.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-kLa1r9z_wJw/UBb_VE_L5TI/AAAAAAAAFVA/6BDYpTtM1vk/s640/blogger-image-1825038907.jpg" /></a></div><div class="separator"style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-beEj5OL7c-o/UBb_VVPRTZI/AAAAAAAAFVI/BYl-yg6981E/s640/blogger-image-1761277014.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-beEj5OL7c-o/UBb_VVPRTZI/AAAAAAAAFVI/BYl-yg6981E/s640/blogger-image-1761277014.jpg" /></a></div><div class="separator"style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-AoKxXiiSqec/UBb_VzOptoI/AAAAAAAAFVQ/hoeSoQLziLk/s640/blogger-image--2083282014.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-AoKxXiiSqec/UBb_VzOptoI/AAAAAAAAFVQ/hoeSoQLziLk/s640/blogger-image--2083282014.jpg" /></a></div> garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com10tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-89621591860290619982012-05-06T21:08:00.001-07:002012-05-06T21:08:43.424-07:00North Shore Explore It's always nice to get out and properly explore your own backyard. All too often we get caught up in what we already know and we forget to explore. As runners I think we can get stuck with our 'two hour run route', our 'favorite mountain route', our 'long run route' etc, etc. We are mostly creatures of habit and when I want to run hard for a few hours I certainly don't want to take time figuring out where the heck I am.<br /><br />Today was the opposite. A backyard exploration day where I was made to promise that I wouldn't run. Hiking only dammit. The plan was four or five hours on foot simply meandering our way through the mountains with no real plan in place. In the end we were rewarded for our lack of planning by happening across what has to be one of the largest remaining living trees in North Vancouver. The funny thing about this trail is that I could see my general direction of travel through the forest but had no real idea of if it would allow us to do a loop, or if we'd end up back tracking for over an hour. In the end it could not have worked out any better as we had nothing but a short but frigid water crossing to bring us to within three kilometers of where we'd dropped our car. It was the most fun I've had while not running in the mountains in a very long time, and the best part about it...I now have a NEW FAVORITE 20km route that I can't wait to RUN!<br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-jLQqzhdXFoE/T6dHeup20VI/AAAAAAAAFPY/VFMRSKXivqs/s1600/IMG_3921.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="168" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-jLQqzhdXFoE/T6dHeup20VI/AAAAAAAAFPY/VFMRSKXivqs/s320/IMG_3921.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">We started off by going up BCMC and playing in the snow</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-OM33CouGiRE/T6dHVvnnAiI/AAAAAAAAFO4/oMVNNrU6ibI/s1600/IMG_3889.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-OM33CouGiRE/T6dHVvnnAiI/AAAAAAAAFO4/oMVNNrU6ibI/s320/IMG_3889.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Thankfully Mountain Highway had recently been plowed</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-MigFD3h7myg/T6dHj7fshHI/AAAAAAAAFPw/YVPSiKN1dZY/s1600/IMG_3928.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-MigFD3h7myg/T6dHj7fshHI/AAAAAAAAFPw/YVPSiKN1dZY/s320/IMG_3928.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Which made for some real fun snow cave running</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vrmnkH4CKwc/T6dHXyfFRgI/AAAAAAAAFPA/4dStlodSV34/s1600/IMG_3899.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vrmnkH4CKwc/T6dHXyfFRgI/AAAAAAAAFPA/4dStlodSV34/s320/IMG_3899.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Messing around with a large stump</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-UxPSgAa3VRQ/T6dHaOi5szI/AAAAAAAAFPI/s0uw6gmHwq4/s1600/IMG_3907.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-UxPSgAa3VRQ/T6dHaOi5szI/AAAAAAAAFPI/s0uw6gmHwq4/s320/IMG_3907.JPG" width="239" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Finding the grand daddy of the living in North Van</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-WQWbcWfZZ6g/T6dHcoSqGDI/AAAAAAAAFPQ/9cOi8uxQWE0/s1600/IMG_3911.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-WQWbcWfZZ6g/T6dHcoSqGDI/AAAAAAAAFPQ/9cOi8uxQWE0/s320/IMG_3911.JPG" width="239" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">If only this would load properly</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-M3W2wIe3iIM/T6dHgYSeXNI/AAAAAAAAFPo/1qYjO8kp9E8/s1600/IMG_3927.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-M3W2wIe3iIM/T6dHgYSeXNI/AAAAAAAAFPo/1qYjO8kp9E8/s320/IMG_3927.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Big hug for the big tree</td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-09xavP1GYOE/T6dHe-d7jbI/AAAAAAAAFPg/pWvE-BcJ45M/s1600/IMG_3923.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-09xavP1GYOE/T6dHe-d7jbI/AAAAAAAAFPg/pWvE-BcJ45M/s320/IMG_3923.JPG" width="299" /></a></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-LksOFqLdN2s/T6dHlcLCevI/AAAAAAAAFP4/A-WCCuyb2f8/s1600/IMG_3929.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-LksOFqLdN2s/T6dHlcLCevI/AAAAAAAAFP4/A-WCCuyb2f8/s320/IMG_3929.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">and the look of (joking) disdain for the frigid river crossing to cap it all off:)</td></tr></tbody></table>GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-35988480001207347262012-05-03T11:35:00.000-07:002013-05-13T14:07:11.277-07:00The Mountains Are Calling - Thank You Orthofix <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-lUpKy9JXMuE/UZFVb6V5h0I/AAAAAAAALL0/gQCvopjL908/s1600/IMG_5697.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-lUpKy9JXMuE/UZFVb6V5h0I/AAAAAAAALL0/gQCvopjL908/s320/IMG_5697.JPG" width="320" /></a></div>Back in December when I was just starting to dream about actually running again I hit up top notch ultra runner and physician's assistant <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/slukenelson" target="_blank">Luke Nelson</a>. Based out of Utah I had met him just four months prior at <a href="http://www.outdoorretailer.com/" target="_blank">OR</a> and within minutes there was that instant connection that ultra runners always seem to find.<br /><br />"You like running. I like running. You like talking about gear. I like talking about gear. You like trash talking. I like trash talking. Let's be friends FOREVER! LIKE TOTALLY!"<br /><br />Luke has insights into both the complexities of the jones fracture, and the stresses and strains both physical and mental, of attempting to be a competitve ultra runner.<br /><br />Luke was kind enough to lay out a strategic plan of attack for my 2012 season that would ideally allow me to finally make that starting line at <a href="http://www.ultratrailmb.com/" target="_blank">UTMB</a> at the end of August. In line with that plan was a slow increase of mileage instead of the 0-60miles an hour, or better yet 0-100miles a week, that I incorporated into my training at this time last year. There was one additional stipulation however, NO MOUNTAINS. I know right, what's the point of running if there aren't mountains involved. Turns out that I guess there's something to that four or five times your body weight on descents that might stress a healing bone. Stupid physics.<br /><br />MAY. That was what it all said. In MAY, assuming I'd had a successful build back at it through the first four months of the year, I could start in on some of those climbs and descents I used to live for. Yesterday was May 2nd and with a mix of slight trepidation and blatant excitement (not excrement, thankfully) I headed back into the mountains and onto one of my old favorites. A local trail called BCMC that's crazy technical and climbs 2700ft in well under 2miles. I had ZERO expectations but once I was out there I decided to see where my fitness lay compared to when I was last healthy. Apparently excitement carries with it adrenaline which is the perfect fuel to stoke an internally competitive fire. By the time I'd topped out I had to do a double take on my watch. I don't actually know my fastest time on this trail, but this was certainly right up there with them and significantly faster than I'd anticipated, in fact I had myself mentally prepared for a time nearly eight minutes slower, no really it went THAT well.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-a5Qj3SuvGFI/UZFV9sIwe1I/AAAAAAAALL8/X8zycSR4UwM/s1600/IMG_5337.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-a5Qj3SuvGFI/UZFV9sIwe1I/AAAAAAAALL8/X8zycSR4UwM/s320/IMG_5337.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div>As I cruised back down the trail smiling from ear to ear I ran into Canada's top ultra runner <a href="http://cdamaampbell.blogspot.ca/" target="_blank">Mr. Adam Campbell</a>. After a five minute catch up I have to say that he's doing some pretty special things right now, not just in his racing but in his own training. His <a href="http://www.ultratrailmtfuji.com/" target="_blank">100mile debut</a> is coming in two weeks time and I'd have to say I believe he's poised to do something great over in Japan.<br /><br />Back to the point. Last summer after snapping my 5th metatarsal for the second time in mere months I had a follow up xray six weeks out that could not have been any worse. Here's the evidence of just how bad that was. A month and a half after breaking my foot and it had actually gotten worse, not better.<br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-wrpcClt0pgc/T6LLMY0gmHI/AAAAAAAAFNk/2Oj7wybzkBc/s1600/IMG_2641.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="200" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-wrpcClt0pgc/T6LLMY0gmHI/AAAAAAAAFNk/2Oj7wybzkBc/s200/IMG_2641.JPG" width="150" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Late June 11 - 6 weeks out</td></tr></tbody></table>This brings me to my point...I had one for once. I had a life saving moment in which I got educated on, and into contact with a brand/device called the <a href="http://bonestimulation.com/physio/index.html" target="_blank">Orthofix Bone Stimulator</a>. I had a non-union fracture and both sides of that fracture were still quite angry with each other. Neither side had apologized and both were still blaming the other for the second such break...when in fact it was pretty much all my minds fault for telling my foot it was healthy enough and had to do 100mile training weeks just a few months off crutches. See how I effectively removed the blame of myself and segmented it into parts of my own body. My hands are clean here.<br /><br /><br />"I hate you" says the medial side of the fracture,<br /><br />"I hate you" says the lateral side of the fracture,<br /><br />"This is YOUR fault"<br /><br />"NO F-IN WAY DUDE. YOU f-ed up this time!"<br /><br />"Screw you!"<br /><br />"Screw ME? How bout SCREW YOU. It'll take a f-in screw before I ever consider talking to YOU again!"<br /><br />"Bring on the hardware. Get bent"<br /><br />Along came the Orthofix Bone Stimulator, effectively acting like a mediator<br /><br />"What's up guys?" Probably best to add in an Ikea accent for effect here<br /><br />"F#$K you asshole" Angry bones are angry bones, what can I say<br /><br />"Ohh, that's not very nice" Ikea accent<br /><br />"Seriously, who the f are you? We're waiting for surgery. One more bad x-ray and it's guaranteed. Coupla more weeks and we should be good to go here."<br /><br />"Well I know you guys won't want to listen to anything I have to say about the possible complications with surgery and how many athletes have had to have the screws removed after the fact so how bout a little massage to ease you minds" Ikea accent<br /><br />"Massage? Don't touch us ya creep. And what's with your funny accent?"<br /><br />"It's okay, people really like me when they get to know me. My second job is building human mazes filled with furniture were whole families have been known to disappear for months on end."<br /><br />"Weirdo"<br /><br />"Just a wee little mass-age. What's the harm in that?"<br /><br />"Get...oh that feels kinda nice. HEY, hands off, what did we just sayyyyy, that's fantastic. Do you work out? Your hands are so strong and yet supple. What did you say your name was?"<br /><br />"<a href="http://bonestimulation.com/physio/index.html" target="_blank">Orthofix</a>"<br /><br />"Ohhhh, you're like a magician in there"<br /><br />"Well I..."<br /><br />"Ya know what, lateral side of non-union fracture"<br /><br />"No what, medial side of non-union fracture?"<br /><br />"I miss you"<br /><br />"Ohh I MISS YOU TOO honey bunny"<br /><br />"CENSORED" moans and growns<br /><br />"My work here is done. I'll be back tomorrow for another three hour treatment" funny accent<br /><br />That's the technical description of what happened. Here it is in laymen's terms:<br /><br /><i>The Physio-Stim Bone Growth Stimulator uses a very low-strength pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) to activate the body’s natural healing process.</i><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><br /><i style="font-style: italic;">Electrical currents have been used to heal broken bones since the mid 1800s. However, it wasn't until the 1950s that scientists made an important discovery. When human bone is bent or broken, it generates an electrical field. This low-level electrical field activates the body's internal repair mechanism, which in turn stimulates bone healing.</i><br /><br /><i style="font-style: italic;">In some patients, this healing process is impaired or absent. The fracture fragments may not mend properly, and a nonunion results. The bone growth stimulation provided by Physio-Stim has proven very successful in treating fracture nonunions. In clinical studies, Physio-Stim helped 8 out of every 10 patients to heal.</i><br /><br />This was followed by a daily treatment of three hours of bone stimulation. Non painful, and most nights I just slept with it on. Less than five weeks later and "the proof of the pudding was in the eating"<br /><br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="float: left; margin-right: 1em; text-align: left;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-DYKOYodkvOg/T6LMs50ylWI/AAAAAAAAFOI/JEAaugfo2kM/s1600/IMG_2917.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="174" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-DYKOYodkvOg/T6LMs50ylWI/AAAAAAAAFOI/JEAaugfo2kM/s200/IMG_2917.JPG" width="200" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Late July 2011</td></tr></tbody></table>Surgery, thankfully, was completely ruled out as it was evident that the Orthofix was doing it's job nicely and I was on the eventual road to recovery.<br /><br />I had a safety follow up x-ray just last week and Luke's response summed it all up nicely,<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vtEXZxEwLQQ/T6LNaXyZonI/AAAAAAAAFOU/Un2-ST75lG0/s1600/IMG_3811.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="200" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vtEXZxEwLQQ/T6LNaXyZonI/AAAAAAAAFOU/Un2-ST75lG0/s200/IMG_3811.JPG" width="150" /></a></div>"I'm super impressed by what your body has been able to do here. It looks fantastic."<br /><br />Where would we all be without a little help from our friends? THANK YOU <a href="http://bonestimulation.com/physio/index.html" target="_blank">Orthofix</a> for getting my body to &nbsp;communicate with itself again. I can conclusively say that I would not be sitting here today (prepping to go on another mountain run) without a pin in my foot had it not been for your timely intervention.<br /><br />(left image is late April 2012)<br />Two thumbs and one healed Jone's Fracture up from this kid. Now bring on the mountains already!!<br />I should also mention a huge thanks to my non-surgery surgeon Dr. Dory Boyer for always allowing me more of his time than he really had, supporting my every decision along the way, and getting me into contact with the crew over at Orthofix.I couldn't have done it without any/all of them.<br /><br />GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com5tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-68780564533397293302012-04-27T07:30:00.000-07:002012-04-27T07:30:00.933-07:00Here Comes The MOMAR Less than six weeks until the second edition of the Burnaby MOMAR takes off in...well Burnaby of course.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-eg4pZfNjHE4/T5ZEW0pHGoI/AAAAAAAAFLc/1E3Pout1fUg/s1600/IMG_3282.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="200" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-eg4pZfNjHE4/T5ZEW0pHGoI/AAAAAAAAFLc/1E3Pout1fUg/s200/IMG_3282.JPG" width="200" /></a></div>Last year we had a solid debut in a slightly unconventional location, at least compared to the majority of the areas the MOMAR has historically visited. Burnaby Mountain out at SFU made for a fantastic mid-point of the race as we truly had a unique urban orienteering stage throughout the university's architecture. Many competitors referred to it as the highlight of the day for them.<br /><br />Overall, competitors in the first ever Burnaby MOMAR seemed impressed, if not amazed, at the varied landscape and combined elevation profile which proved to be much hillier terrain than most envisioned possible. As a course director I was pumped on our kayaking stage as it brought racers back into the waters of Deep Cove, which as anyone who's frequented the area can attest to is one of the most scenic paddling locations in BC's lower mainland.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-l1x245g9-hQ/T5ZEVXy1lzI/AAAAAAAAFLU/uadg0sRDNj4/s1600/IMG_3281.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="200" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-l1x245g9-hQ/T5ZEVXy1lzI/AAAAAAAAFLU/uadg0sRDNj4/s200/IMG_3281.JPG" width="200" /></a></div>From there I found that I was content with the climbing offered throughout our race and that the singletrack riding really rounded out what I believed was necessary to brand this as a MOMAR worthy event. My only true complaint as a course designer last year was that I was somewhat resigned to a few too many necessary urban road connections when I truly desired to incorporate more mud, dirt, and forest. Thankfully, The City of Burnaby did us as racers and them as a city a major favor during the 11 months since last year's event...the built more trails! Really nice, buffed out, professional grade stuff that links together this years course in ways we could have only wished for just one year ago. As such we are able to say that almost 35% of the trails we're including in this, the second edition of the Burnaby MOMAR, either weren't touched last year or simply did not exist. As a course designer it's hard to ask for much more than that!<br /><br />I'm confident that no matter how familiar you may think you are with the terrain around SFU, you'll thoroughly enjoy what we're pieced together for you on June 2nd.<br /><br />Bryan and I had a bit of fun a few weeks ago and created a short video of our day out on course. Check it out along with a few pics I snapped back in Feb and we hope to see you out come race day.<br /><br /><a href="http://www.mindovermountain.com/momar/schedule/momar_001/momar_001.htm" target="_blank">MOMAR Race Page</a><br /><br /><br /><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Y7E051UrogQ" width="420"></iframe><br /><br />GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-72384112920360303272012-04-04T22:37:00.000-07:002012-04-04T22:37:51.189-07:00Squamish50 First Half - My Longest Run (42km) This past Saturday March 31st I had the pleasure of touring four friends around the full first half of the <a href="http://www.squamish50.com/" target="_blank">Squamish50</a> course. It was my longest personal run since pre-I Never Wanna Talk About It Again, which dates back to mid May of last year. Needless to say I was very, very happy with the day.<br /><br />Turns out our course is almost exactly a marathon distance from our starting point on The Squamish Spit until our midway point at <a href="http://www.questu.ca/multimedia/video_and_blogs.php" target="_blank">Quest University</a>, in fact if I had added on our first little loop around The Spit to string out the eventual racing field it would have come in at pretty much exactly 42.2km. We'll likely add this to our race options in 2013 since it's already built in completely by accident...err, by design, yeah by design, I'm smrt like that.<br /><br />Here's the Garmin file for those looking for a bit more course insight and just below are the highlight pictures of the day AND a short under 2min video in which the first minute was filmed during our run on Saturday.<br /><br />Oh yeah, and here's the compliment of the day which I have to share cause it makes me look good, and I rarely get a chance to do/say that:<br /><br />North Face Ambassador Athlete Sasha Brown: <i>I was lucky enough to get a guided tour of the first half of the course on Saturday! I have to say: IT IS AMAZING!!! I know many of the Squamish trails, and Gary still managed to shock and awe me with the selection and variety! :) If you're on the fence - Sign up! You will be treated to an impressive event.</i><br /><iframe frameborder="0" height="548" src="http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/163472263" width="465"></iframe><br /><br /><br /><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/PsEVk9KNpwg" width="450"></iframe><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-bF0VWPmMQRE/T30uOfmFe8I/AAAAAAAAFIg/mV-qVcAQS5o/s1600/IMG_3641.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-bF0VWPmMQRE/T30uOfmFe8I/AAAAAAAAFIg/mV-qVcAQS5o/s320/IMG_3641.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-f_ia8gBaxeY/T30t5ivghEI/AAAAAAAAFHA/EPbqj4jBSbM/s1600/IMG_3606.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-f_ia8gBaxeY/T30t5ivghEI/AAAAAAAAFHA/EPbqj4jBSbM/s320/IMG_3606.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--Kmer2qGZy0/T30t15-frzI/AAAAAAAAFGo/fpMODM8c_78/s1600/IMG_3602.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/--Kmer2qGZy0/T30t15-frzI/AAAAAAAAFGo/fpMODM8c_78/s320/IMG_3602.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KKi854koMsY/T30t4RVoGvI/AAAAAAAAFG4/5A1RP6lazKY/s1600/IMG_3605.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KKi854koMsY/T30t4RVoGvI/AAAAAAAAFG4/5A1RP6lazKY/s320/IMG_3605.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-i9cbRZ73O7A/T30t3UyYbKI/AAAAAAAAFGw/vZwPQWSyZU4/s1600/IMG_3603.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-i9cbRZ73O7A/T30t3UyYbKI/AAAAAAAAFGw/vZwPQWSyZU4/s320/IMG_3603.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-HmFBlJ6BBu0/T30t60HgPNI/AAAAAAAAFHI/JDBIhxCbw1s/s1600/IMG_3608.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="138" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-HmFBlJ6BBu0/T30t60HgPNI/AAAAAAAAFHI/JDBIhxCbw1s/s320/IMG_3608.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-po1Aj-nvZaM/T30t77hNkqI/AAAAAAAAFHQ/RMmSfMr2UeA/s1600/IMG_3615.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-po1Aj-nvZaM/T30t77hNkqI/AAAAAAAAFHQ/RMmSfMr2UeA/s320/IMG_3615.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-TYDynrdiU6o/T30t9TS7L4I/AAAAAAAAFHY/uJcZq8qx_Gs/s1600/IMG_3616.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-TYDynrdiU6o/T30t9TS7L4I/AAAAAAAAFHY/uJcZq8qx_Gs/s320/IMG_3616.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MEOxjiLWRY0/T30t-JAMN8I/AAAAAAAAFHg/5pjeAtz_lf8/s1600/IMG_3619.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="134" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MEOxjiLWRY0/T30t-JAMN8I/AAAAAAAAFHg/5pjeAtz_lf8/s320/IMG_3619.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-qGqzxGE9aNs/T30uALDBEhI/AAAAAAAAFHo/eJx9EPyZZ4I/s1600/IMG_3620.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-qGqzxGE9aNs/T30uALDBEhI/AAAAAAAAFHo/eJx9EPyZZ4I/s320/IMG_3620.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-DDCbKhkWJxE/T30uBy7cjGI/AAAAAAAAFHw/bWewTBm_QK0/s1600/IMG_3625.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="208" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-DDCbKhkWJxE/T30uBy7cjGI/AAAAAAAAFHw/bWewTBm_QK0/s320/IMG_3625.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-K3ENlTogIuw/T30uD4BsX9I/AAAAAAAAFH4/UuoJTL0iuq8/s1600/IMG_3627.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-K3ENlTogIuw/T30uD4BsX9I/AAAAAAAAFH4/UuoJTL0iuq8/s320/IMG_3627.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-FkbyTjr0Wn0/T30uFUbkeMI/AAAAAAAAFIA/QIuw78R-5gg/s1600/IMG_3630.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-FkbyTjr0Wn0/T30uFUbkeMI/AAAAAAAAFIA/QIuw78R-5gg/s320/IMG_3630.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Vm1O6C6pCic/T30uHdSP3fI/AAAAAAAAFII/sg-Sw0tbJOw/s1600/IMG_3631.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Vm1O6C6pCic/T30uHdSP3fI/AAAAAAAAFII/sg-Sw0tbJOw/s320/IMG_3631.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-hYjmtzetnhc/T30uKE9UXTI/AAAAAAAAFIQ/2N--N2HxgFA/s1600/IMG_3633.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-hYjmtzetnhc/T30uKE9UXTI/AAAAAAAAFIQ/2N--N2HxgFA/s320/IMG_3633.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-fIaUmivt0iA/T30uMbtOAeI/AAAAAAAAFIY/eDX4pddIWiM/s1600/IMG_3637.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-fIaUmivt0iA/T30uMbtOAeI/AAAAAAAAFIY/eDX4pddIWiM/s320/IMG_3637.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NsnGOMVHyPw/T30uPb3lzxI/AAAAAAAAFIs/eA-UrdviJRo/s1600/IMG_3645.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NsnGOMVHyPw/T30uPb3lzxI/AAAAAAAAFIs/eA-UrdviJRo/s320/IMG_3645.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RM0HxG4YVNc/T30uOx-UT2I/AAAAAAAAFIk/6ipZYPVJS2I/s1600/IMG_3644.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RM0HxG4YVNc/T30uOx-UT2I/AAAAAAAAFIk/6ipZYPVJS2I/s320/IMG_3644.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-kklzKIeuTSk/T30uQBdXXzI/AAAAAAAAFJA/O7LQnKU7bCY/s1600/IMG_3649.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-kklzKIeuTSk/T30uQBdXXzI/AAAAAAAAFJA/O7LQnKU7bCY/s320/IMG_3649.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_ciRoaYDtx0/T30uPzt-WWI/AAAAAAAAFI4/x20utPLq-oY/s1600/IMG_3647.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_ciRoaYDtx0/T30uPzt-WWI/AAAAAAAAFI4/x20utPLq-oY/s320/IMG_3647.JPG" width="320" /></a></div><br />GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-26235438896401136492012-03-21T23:05:00.001-07:002012-03-22T22:56:47.737-07:0050miles Of Philly & Not A Single Cheese Steak (a photo tour) <div>Last week I had the pleasure of going to Philadelphia for the very first time as I joined my girlfriend who was attending a librarian conference there. We were blessed with incredible weather and lots of free time to tour around on foot, which of course is the only real way to check out a new place.&nbsp;</div><div><br /></div><div>I gotta say Philly is one amazingly historic and beautiful city. It has its issues for sure, a few of which are that people love to relentlessly honk the hell outta their car horns&nbsp;and often it's difficult to surmise why they even honked to begin with.&nbsp;Garbage doesn't seem to find its way into garbage bins all too often, and the city certainly appears to have seen better days.&nbsp;</div><div><br /></div><div>There is a definite rough edge quality to Philadelphia, which was evidenced by the fact that Linda's cell phone was stolen from a restaurant we were in only to give us a GPS signal 24hr later from an area north of us. Upon filing the police report their exact words after hearing me say I wanted to head up there and knock on the door was "We don't even wanna go up there!"...so none of us did, as of course police can't just knock on someones door and say "Hey a GPS signal says you stole this girls phone. Please give it back." Despite this however we had an incredible time and thoroughly enjoyed the fact that everywhere you turned there was history to be had, as should be the case within a city founded in 1682 that was the largest city in the US at the turn of the 19th century. Below are some of the highlights of the week<br /><br /></div><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-7nFe52wC7JY/T2mHceqKhnI/AAAAAAAAFDQ/g1onjl7rNx8/s1600/IMG_3473.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-7nFe52wC7JY/T2mHceqKhnI/AAAAAAAAFDQ/g1onjl7rNx8/s320/IMG_3473.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Less than two hours after hitting the tarmac at the airport</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-z9yLS3YkX7U/T2mHwejMBWI/AAAAAAAAFEw/-U22CyohcZ8/s1600/SAM_0408.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-z9yLS3YkX7U/T2mHwejMBWI/AAAAAAAAFEw/-U22CyohcZ8/s320/SAM_0408.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Scalpers tickets got me into Philly vs NJD</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-BMqe_Xz4A70/T2mHNYBGKSI/AAAAAAAAFCI/iY9GMUk3XCg/s1600/IMG_3343.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-BMqe_Xz4A70/T2mHNYBGKSI/AAAAAAAAFCI/iY9GMUk3XCg/s320/IMG_3343.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">By the 1st intermission I was drinking with the locals. Note that my MHW Effusion DryQ jacket in Flyers Orange certainly helped with the male bonding/free beers.</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-p0I6Tl21XiQ/T2mHgcAQOAI/AAAAAAAAFDo/b32U6neERlI/s1600/IMG_3479.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-p0I6Tl21XiQ/T2mHgcAQOAI/AAAAAAAAFDo/b32U6neERlI/s320/IMG_3479.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Flyers win 3-0 and lots of history hanging in the rafters</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-WjC_2Hn1MI4/T2mHzy6pmDI/AAAAAAAAFFA/k-fPTzHpPXY/s1600/photo.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-WjC_2Hn1MI4/T2mHzy6pmDI/AAAAAAAAFFA/k-fPTzHpPXY/s320/photo.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Yo Adrian</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vyHiTlC7IyU/T2mHxy1YGwI/AAAAAAAAFE4/t8GcsjCzRVs/s1600/photo+%25281%2529.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vyHiTlC7IyU/T2mHxy1YGwI/AAAAAAAAFE4/t8GcsjCzRVs/s320/photo+%25281%2529.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Came across this personal shrine on our self guided city run tour</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NvQ1OfiO6OY/T2mHSVXSW8I/AAAAAAAAFCY/xdgriVnPcfo/s1600/IMG_3370.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NvQ1OfiO6OY/T2mHSVXSW8I/AAAAAAAAFCY/xdgriVnPcfo/s320/IMG_3370.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Street art is always worth checking out</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IgLCPKT803Y/T2mHdn2n1CI/AAAAAAAAFDY/RDJM9biRLqs/s1600/IMG_3474.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-IgLCPKT803Y/T2mHdn2n1CI/AAAAAAAAFDY/RDJM9biRLqs/s320/IMG_3474.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Captioned: Their bands have broken asunder</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0ZC6x1udWSg/T2mHexvU3gI/AAAAAAAAFDg/0twIRl4TYwI/s1600/IMG_3476.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0ZC6x1udWSg/T2mHexvU3gI/AAAAAAAAFDg/0twIRl4TYwI/s320/IMG_3476.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">View back over the city from the run along Schuylkill River</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-8-RWu_RrXsc/T2mHTnzUAoI/AAAAAAAAFCg/Y4OmMxOc8W8/s1600/IMG_3420.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-8-RWu_RrXsc/T2mHTnzUAoI/AAAAAAAAFCg/Y4OmMxOc8W8/s320/IMG_3420.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Amazing statues/history at every turn</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-uWZoCBMfBWc/T2mHhq1gYqI/AAAAAAAAFDw/mdVgFgZePjM/s1600/IMG_3481.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-uWZoCBMfBWc/T2mHhq1gYqI/AAAAAAAAFDw/mdVgFgZePjM/s320/IMG_3481.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">The City of Brotherly...</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-lDqSvVINTnk/T2mHP8jaC0I/AAAAAAAAFCQ/iWgoG78fPkw/s1600/IMG_3356.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-lDqSvVINTnk/T2mHP8jaC0I/AAAAAAAAFCQ/iWgoG78fPkw/s320/IMG_3356.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Yeah we had to. Celebrating our 33km run</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_9jQ_Hwp9Ro/T2mHYjUT3SI/AAAAAAAAFC4/jqjaXZwgDcI/s1600/IMG_3470.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_9jQ_Hwp9Ro/T2mHYjUT3SI/AAAAAAAAFC4/jqjaXZwgDcI/s320/IMG_3470.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Kinda says it all</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-rEzGrZkHOvo/T2mHZj6nG4I/AAAAAAAAFDA/ukm16Cv-mwQ/s1600/IMG_3471.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-rEzGrZkHOvo/T2mHZj6nG4I/AAAAAAAAFDA/ukm16Cv-mwQ/s320/IMG_3471.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Yes their sign is completely warranted</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-TrXFPkLZGew/T2mHXgibkUI/AAAAAAAAFCw/CqqP-aIa_QM/s1600/IMG_3453.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-TrXFPkLZGew/T2mHXgibkUI/AAAAAAAAFCw/CqqP-aIa_QM/s320/IMG_3453.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Visiting Princeton Tec factory</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-OYY0wlPxQHw/T2mHaoZF-5I/AAAAAAAAFDI/JWZ9RPI553Q/s1600/IMG_3472.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-OYY0wlPxQHw/T2mHaoZF-5I/AAAAAAAAFDI/JWZ9RPI553Q/s320/IMG_3472.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Getting to personally construct two Fuel headlamps</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4tBYKWoWzMQ/T2mHVj4EQ2I/AAAAAAAAFCo/kGfpIWWm0I4/s1600/IMG_3436.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4tBYKWoWzMQ/T2mHVj4EQ2I/AAAAAAAAFCo/kGfpIWWm0I4/s320/IMG_3436.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Crashing the Librarian Conference Party...free drinks!</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-2T5r6VfZ6MI/T2mHseZBGYI/AAAAAAAAFEg/x4TBbHvFkEg/s1600/IMG_3531.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-2T5r6VfZ6MI/T2mHseZBGYI/AAAAAAAAFEg/x4TBbHvFkEg/s320/IMG_3531.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Talkin to a few stiffs</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nENN0RQW8_s/T2mHtZLlsDI/AAAAAAAAFEo/Vl-HHpdKJkg/s1600/IMG_3532.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nENN0RQW8_s/T2mHtZLlsDI/AAAAAAAAFEo/Vl-HHpdKJkg/s320/IMG_3532.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">How they really worked their way through the signing of the Constitution</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-hFgFDjdkOQ8/T2mHoP7DvcI/AAAAAAAAFEI/BELkopWzyV8/s1600/IMG_3508.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-hFgFDjdkOQ8/T2mHoP7DvcI/AAAAAAAAFEI/BELkopWzyV8/s320/IMG_3508.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">No gluten free, soy free, dairy free options...weird</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Albc13vSBYU/T2mHq9twKlI/AAAAAAAAFEY/_oCGcm_HdbQ/s1600/IMG_3525.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Albc13vSBYU/T2mHq9twKlI/AAAAAAAAFEY/_oCGcm_HdbQ/s320/IMG_3525.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">The Liberty Bell</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-gYGgp6xgiGo/T2mHmdq-xjI/AAAAAAAAFEA/6iyYb7Saxkc/s1600/IMG_3503.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-gYGgp6xgiGo/T2mHmdq-xjI/AAAAAAAAFEA/6iyYb7Saxkc/s320/IMG_3503.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Big fan of these sidewalk accessed underground staircases</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Z5gBx0O_EcY/T2mHkJha1II/AAAAAAAAFD4/vcfyP-YDzOE/s1600/IMG_3489.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Z5gBx0O_EcY/T2mHkJha1II/AAAAAAAAFD4/vcfyP-YDzOE/s320/IMG_3489.JPG" width="239" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Things I should not be able to forget I packed in my carry on and find once I arrive</td></tr></tbody></table><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-hQ4KcpeZzJ8/T2mHpUB9xqI/AAAAAAAAFEQ/fqhYHKMQ75c/s1600/IMG_3513.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-hQ4KcpeZzJ8/T2mHpUB9xqI/AAAAAAAAFEQ/fqhYHKMQ75c/s320/IMG_3513.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Best window seat ever for return flight</td></tr></tbody></table>And as mentioned above I hit 52miles / 85km of running. It's all starting to come together. Slowly but surely.<br /><br />GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-82050819541189727452012-02-12T18:11:00.000-08:002012-02-12T18:11:14.067-08:00100 Miles! <br />Well it took three full weeks of running to get there, but I'm still pretty damn happy to be able to say it. The last twenty one days have consisted of 50km - 53km - 57km for a grand total of 160k or 100 miles.<br /><br />Slowly but surely I'm working my way back towards the ability to cover this distance in a single day. More than anything though I'm just incredibly happy and thankful to be regularly running again.<br /><br />It's not about the mileage, or the racing for that matter, it's about the simple and undeniable love of the ability to cover distances under my own steam through beautiful environments. That and that alone is what I missed most about 2011 and what I am loving the most about 2012 so far. I had a moment on a recent trail run on Orcas Island that made me realize that I desire most to be a runner for life. Competitive running will eventually fall by the wayside, and I'll be ok with that when the time comes. I am most certainly going to put everything I can into my running over the next few years, but my end goal is definitely longevity. I dream of happily and easily running distances into my 60s and 70s and I never would have had that appreciation, had I not been sidelined for so long.<br /><br />I love to run, and I never want to lose that love again. I hope I am finally on the right path to achieve this long term goal.<br /><br />GR<br /> garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com7tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-18128070888411947482012-02-11T10:09:00.000-08:002012-02-11T10:09:14.822-08:00Running Stupid - I Interview Ken I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Running Stupid's very own Ken Michal in a flipping of the script as I stole his mic and took over the <a href="http://runningstupid.libsyn.com/" target="_blank">Running Stupid</a> broadcast. It was a lot of fun as we traded a bunch of stories and laughs, talking about everything from The HURT 100 to WS to the common theme of over-training in ultra running. I can't guarantee you'll learn anything, but hopefully you'll at least get a chuckle or two.<div><br /></div><div><a href="http://hw.libsyn.com/p/e/9/3/e93a1de162370a22/Running_Stupid_CI_Ken_Michal_Interview.mp3?sid=6d6e4e090ba700899113c2150fbadb4c&amp;l_sid=20813&amp;l_eid=&amp;l_mid=2899631&amp;expiration=1328987603&amp;hwt=52d393682453a018c789b484a07d1497" target="_blank">Interview here</a></div><div><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AVXsZkALOok/TzaqHaUoEeI/AAAAAAAAFA0/S89YuMmvIb4/s320/RS+HURT+Pic.jpg" width="320" /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-BrJQgCAlzC8/Tzaqe8nTieI/AAAAAAAAFA8/OBU-wDo-5XE/s1600/Running+Stupid+logo.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-BrJQgCAlzC8/Tzaqe8nTieI/AAAAAAAAFA8/OBU-wDo-5XE/s1600/Running+Stupid+logo.jpg" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div>GR</div> garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com3tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-1987606181857147182012-01-08T17:12:00.000-08:002012-01-08T17:28:22.439-08:00(video) 215km East Coast Trail Speed Record On Friday, August 20th, 2010, I set out to run the 215km long East Coast Trail from Cappahaden to St. John's in a non-stop speed record fashion. Exactly two weeks prior I had run the 75km (80km) West Coast Trail and messed up my hip (glute med) in the process. This would be the pain and injury I keep referencing in the film below, and why I was unable to run for so long following the completion of the ECT. I distinctly remember saying to my Mother the day before the ECT attempt that I needed another day or two to recover/prepare/sleep, to which she responded,<br /><br />"You have to do this now. The extended forecast is turning nasty within hours of your anticipated completion. It's now or never. This is your day to do this."<br /><br />Why do Mom's always have to be so damn right all the time?<br /><br /><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/RcC6TS2nRbM" width="450"></iframe><br /><br />I flew across Canada on the red-eye flight from Tuesday the 17th till Wednesday the 18th, departing Vancouver at 10pm and arriving in St. John's at 12:30pm the following day. I managed one full night of rest on the 18-19th, and then stayed at <a href="http://www.canadaselect.com/NewfoundlandandLabrador/AvalonRegion/MidnightHillManor.cfm?section=photos" target="_blank">The Midnight Hill Manor in Renews</a>&nbsp;the night before the attempt (I never got a chance to properly thank them for their incredible hospitality and support of <a href="http://righttoplay.akaraisin.com/pledge/Participant/Home.aspx?seid=2962&amp;pid=256735&amp;mid=9" target="_blank">Right To Play</a>. THANK YOU Carol Ann and Bob)<br /><br />Late on the night of the 19th, after finally feeling confident enough in my preparation, I managed less than four hours of rest before the 4am alarm went off. It <i>was</i> then or never. It <i>did</i> have to happen on that day. I remember thinking to myself that I would have DNS'ed (did not start) any other race with how I was feeling, right down to a 50k distance, yet I showed up and gave it everything I had in me. It was yet another amazing lesson in the power of the human mind and the ability to truly block out pain. I am incredibly proud of this run, and even if I had shown up that day 100% healthy and rested I doubt I would have been much faster anyways. I may just have enjoyed some of it a bit more...what am I saying? It was 35hours on my feet, how much can you ever really enjoy something like that anyways? (I loved every second of it)<br /><br />The above is my official video, thanks to Erik Nachtrieb over at <a href="http://1iopenproductions.com/" target="_blank">1iOpen Productions</a>&nbsp;for tirelessly working on this piece and trimming down my very rough, approximately eight hours of footage into what you see above.<br /><br />I hope you enjoy it.<br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-unvWclvrReE/Two7xElMloI/AAAAAAAAE_E/b-ey4RV0MAk/s1600/SAM_0077.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="240" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-unvWclvrReE/Two7xElMloI/AAAAAAAAE_E/b-ey4RV0MAk/s320/SAM_0077.JPG" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">These are the people that made this run possible. <br />My Ma and Pa, my niece Kayla, brother Bryan, and his wonderful partner Heather</td></tr></tbody></table>GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com12tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-5783092038038653693.post-9432478455979900502012-01-04T16:25:00.000-08:002012-01-04T16:25:13.735-08:00(Video) Taking The Stage At FEAT Canada Back in October Sean Verret asked me if I'd like to join the line up of featured speakers for the first ever Canadian version of a <a href="http://www.featcanada.ca/" target="_blank">FEAT night</a> (Fascinating Expedition and Adventure Talks). The premise both scared and excited me and I said yes when everything inside of me was screaming no. I only have a handful of previous public speaking experience, and though I know I can banter and joke without question behind a mic, my last presentation left me feeling embarrassed for myself. I say this because at the time (two years ago) I simply did not know what it took to produce an engaging talk. I showed up to that one woefully under prepared, as I had left far too much for the last minute.<br /><br />Fast forward to November 2011 and having learned from previous mistakes, I finally realized how much time something like this would take in advance of the night to get it right. Add to that the fact that the FEAT nights are very specific and the 'rules of engagement' are that you get 21 slides, that&nbsp;auto-scroll&nbsp;every 20 seconds, for a grand total of seven minutes. Once you start talking your slides start rolling, and the timer starts counting down. There is very little room for error or improv and as such I am not exaggerating when I say I put well over 40-50hrs into this thing before I took the stage on November 15th.<br /><br /><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/F2xFryG4Qyc" width="450"></iframe><br /><br />I was exceptionally nervous, even though I was among a group of supportive friends and peers. When I walked out on stage I did exactly as I had practiced. I took a deep breath, smiled, and tried to let it all flow. I had memorized the talk inside out and my plan was to easily reference the first few cue cards before finding my rhythm. I guess I was shaking so much that it was noticeable to most of the audience and all I could figure after the fact is that my shaking hands would not allow me to clearly reference my cue cards. Less than a minute in and I blurted out something like<br /><br />"WHAT, THEY'RE NOT IN ORDER?" (when in fact they were)<br /><br />Which was immediately followed by a numbing of my entire body and complete silence, as my world seemed to be shrinking before me. There were numerous umms, and ahhhs as I was completely rattled. The slides were rolling along and I actually turned to the organizers and said,<br /><br />"Can I get a redo?"<br /><br />To which the response was,<br /><br />"Just talk."<br /><br />Now at this point I was angry. Not at the organizers but at myself. You don't get redos in life, period. I'm thankful they simply told me to talk and left me to fend for myself. I had put so much time and effort into this thing that I doubted many others had prepared so thoroughly. Yet I somehow still found myself standing in front of an audience of 400-500 ppl looking dumbfounded and like I'd taken a wrong turn on my way to the bathroom and somehow ended up on stage.<br /><br />As I was internally cursing myself all I could focus on was that I knew the damn talk intimately. It was MY TALK, how could I NOT know it. I looked up, the clock ticking away, now multiple slides behind, and just started rambling off all I could remember. I cut out little bits here and there as I knew I had to catch back up to my slides. I spoke like I did when I first left Newfoundland, when no one else could decipher a word I was saying because I can speak so fast. I continued plugging away and at exactly three minutes I finally managed to align my talk back up with my slides. I remember a huge sense of relief as this happened and again I was grateful for all the back end work I had put into the thing. Knowing my presentation so well, was all that salvaged it. This allowed for me to remove small tidbits along the way, to speed up my voice, and to know exactly when I was back on track.<br /><br />Now for some reason FEAT edited out my 45second debacle, with a cut at 1m25s in. As funny as this is to say I kinda wish it were still in there as it would help explain why I was behind my auto-scrolling slides and speaking rather hurriedly to catch back up. It would also put on full display just how scared I was by the whole evening and how happy I was with myself, after the fact, for pulling it out of the ashes. I was seconds away from simply going down as the one presenter who couldn't handle the pressure. Thankfully I simply went down as the one guy who nearly botched it but somehow managed to pull his head out of his ass just in time to salvage the damn thing.<br /><br />Have a watch, and feel free to let me know your thoughts. I would like to present again somewhere, sometime, and am wide open for constructive feedback.<br /><br />And be sure to check out the next edition of FEAT here in North Vancouver on <a href="http://www.featcanada.ca/2011/12/feat-canada-2-0-tickets-available-now/" target="_blank">Feb 12th</a><br /><br />GR garobbinshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16576460882167758106noreply@blogger.com4